Tuesday, August 9, 2011

WILLIAM SARGENT 1602-1682

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, son of John Bickmore, son of Elizabeth Andrews (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Bills (Bickmore), daughter of Samuel Bill, son of Elizabeth Sargent (Bill), daughter of William Sargent.]


Rev. William Sargeant's signature







First Settlers of Amesbury


Golgotha Burying Ground, Amesbury, Massachusetts
It is a Memorial to the First Settlers Amesbury-1654 Golgotha is their first burying ground. http://gravematter.smugmug.com/gallery/848843#38151999 Location: Amesbury, Massachusetts


1640 Map of Mystic Side of Charlestown (Malden) Massachusetts

1640 Map of Mystic Side of Charlestown (Malden) Massachusetts Source: Title Sargent genealogy: Hugh Sargent, of Courteenhall, Northamptonshire and his descendants in England Authors Aaron Sargent, John S. Sargent Publisher A. Sargent, 1895 Original from the University of Wisconsin - Madison Digitized November 6, 2007 Length 218 pages Google Books

Rendering of the House at Mystic Side
1602-1682, Malden (Mystic Side of Charlestown), Massachusetts

The picture presented is of the house built by William Sargent, and bequeathed by him in his will to his son John. If it is not an exact representation, it has the merit of being as near, and probably nearer, to the original, than some of the modern statues and portraits of distinguished men of former times. The right-hand or east part of the picture, including the door and chimney, was standing until about the year 1890; and the picture is from a photographic copy. The architecture of the left-hand or west part is a matter of conjecture. But there certainly was a west part (and it would as certainly have conformed to the east part) ; for in the Middlesex Registry of Deeds there is a record of an indenture dated March I, 1713, between John Sargent and his sons Jonathan and Ebenezer, in which it is stated that the father " ffor and in consideraton of the naturall and ffatherly good will and affection which he hath and bequath unto his sons, ye said Jonathan and Ebenezar, part of his Dwelling house," "That is to say, The Lower Room in the west end of his Dwelling house with all the Garritt in the west end, with the Barn and all the out houseing and all the Land adjoining thereunto That was his ffather William Sargeants." In his will he gives his wife " the use and benefit of y° East End of my dwelling house from bottom to top," and to his unmarried daughters *' my west chamber," " and a free passage to it." He bequeaths to his sons Jonathan and Ebenezer all his lands not otherwise disposed of, and recites that he has already given them by deed of gift " an Estate in houseing and land." Source: Sargent genealogy: Hugh Sargent, of Courteenhall, Northamptonshire and his descendants in England Authors Aaron Sargent, John S. Sargent Publisher A. Sargent, 1895 Original from the University of Wisconsin - Madison Digitized November 6, 2007 Google Books

COURTEEN HALL

Who Begot Thee?
Book: Who Begot Thee? (found on Googlebooks)
"William Sargent. 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, who was son of Hugh, the Mayor of Northhampton, England, in 1626. Hugh Sargent married Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Gifford of the ancient and distinguish family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in September 1632. Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, co of Salop, gentleman and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire*. William Sargent came to America from Northhampton, England in 1638 with his newly married wife Sarah and two daughters by his first wife. He settled in Charlestown, in that part which afterwards became the town of Malden, where he was a lay preacher in 1648-50. He was also a Deacon and active citizen. He removed to Barnstable December 16, 1682. His widow died January 12, 1689.

HANNAH SARGENT. 1629-1717. Daughter of William. Born in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 to Henry Felch. Died December 15, 1717. Her sister Ruth, married (1) Jonathan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, who's first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came over in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth Chipman died in Sandwich in 1713. In her will she left her bequests to "the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading."
Pages 23-24
FOUND ON ANCESTRY.COM


William Sargeant He was on the freeman list of Northampton, England on July 20, 1626. He was senior Bailiff there 1632-1633. He was a deacon and lay preacher at Malden, Massachusetts. He married first Hannah about 1627. She was born about 1603 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, and died in of Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. He married (2) Mary about 1634. She was born about 1614 Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, and died in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England.

"In the Note Book published in 1885 of Thomas Lechford, lawyer, who was in Boston from 1637 to 1640, the following may be read:
John Winthrop Esqr. Governor of the Jurisdiction of the Massachusetts bay in New England to all manner of persons whome it may concern These are to certify you that William Sergeant late of North- hampton haberdasher of Hatts and now of Charletown in New England planter and Sarah his wife late the wife of William Minshall of Whitechurch in the County of Salop gent. Deceased are both blessed be God in full life and good health at the time of this making hereof. In testimony whereof I have caused the publicke seale of our Colony to be hereto affixed the fourteeneth day of November in the fifteenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of England & c Annoq Dni 1639."

William's farm was in the "southerly part of Mystic Side or Malden, on the southerly slope of a hill, about one and a third miles north-east from the river. The farm was owned by him as early as 1640 with the exception of eight acres southwest of and adjoining the original farm, which he purchased in 1654." He moved to Barnstable probably about 1656. He was made a freeman of Plymouth Colony in 1657. He was a minister in Barnstable and is said to have succeeded the Rev. John Lothrop. He had rented out his farm in Malden.

He will was probated in Plymouth Colony in Plymouth, Massachusetts. It reads:
"The last Will and Testament of Mr. William Serjant of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth, exhibited in the Court held att Plymouth aforsaid on the oathes of Mr. Thomas Hinckley assistant and John Chipman as followeth;

"I William Sargeant
Of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth being weak of body but by the Mercye of God of disposing mind and memory; and calling in mind the uncertainly of this Transitory life, and not knowing how soone it may please God to call mee hence, do therefore make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament, heerby, revoaking and adnulling all former and other will or wills heretofore by mee made eithr in word or writing; and this only to be accumpted and accepted as my Last Will and Testament as followeth.
Imp, I will and bequeath my soule to God in Jesus Christ my Deare Savior and onely redeemer and my body to decent buriall; and as to my Temporall estate which God hath bin pleased far above my deserts, to bestow upon mee, my will is that first of all thatt all my just debts which I owe to any p'son ir right or consience shall be first discharged and satisfyed out of my estate by my executors heerafter named, within convenient time after my decease.

Item-I will and bequeath to Sarah my loveing wife all my household stuffe and two of my Cowes to be wholy att her dispose, and the use of the new end of my now dwelling house, and the use of the new end of my now dwelling house, or the use of one such Room of my house att Maulden, at shee shall chuse in case shee there desire to live during her natural life, and for the further support and stay of liveing I will unto her eight pounds pr annum in current Country pay, to be payed out of the proffits of my lands by my two sons, John and Samuele, during her natural life, vid, my son John to pay six pounds therof and my son Samuel forty shillings therof yeerly, and every yeer during her natural life.

Item-I will and bequeath unto my son, John Sergeant, my house with all my lands att Maulden. To hom and her heirs forever so as hee may said son her heires or assigns, doe wll and truely pay or cause to be payed unto Sarah his mother the sume of six pounds pr annum as above mensioned, and after his said mothers decease, the sum of five pounds as a leganse which I will be payed to my Daughter Hannah Feech within one full yeer after her mothers my said wife her decease; and five pounds as a legacse I give and bequeath to my Daughter Ruth Bourne within two years after my said wifes decease and five pounds more to my said wifes decease. These Legacses to be payed in currant countrye pay at price currant; as they shall grow due and payable;

Item-I will and bequeath unto my son Samuell Sergeant my now Dwelling house with all my land in Barnstable to him and his heirs forever, so as hee the said Samuell his heires or assigns doe well and truely pay or cause to be payed unto the Said Sarah, his mother forty shillings pr annum in Currant Country pay during her natural life, as aforesaid, also I will and bequeath to him the said Samuell my two oxen 2 cowes and a horse with my cart plow and other Tackling thereunto belonging, Item I will to Samuell Bill, my grandson, one heiffer or young horse, and my will it to be leave all the rest of my estate in whatsoever it is unto my executors for the payment of my debts, and discharge of my funerall expences, and I doe hereby appoint and declare Saram my said loveing wife and my Son John Sergeant aforesaid to be my executors of this my Last Will and Testament; and my loveing friends Elder John Chipman and Deacon William Crocker to be ouerseers to see this my last Will and Testament to p'formed according to the true intent therof; in witness wherof I have heerunton sett my hand and seal this ninth day of Mach Ann Dom 1769-80."

The inventory was sworn on March 3, 1692-3.
found on ancestry.com


William Sargeant It is important to point out that I have used the original language and spelling on the records that I have typed into this family history for William Sargeant.

Information from:
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, p. 46.
Birth, Marriage and Death records on this family are from, "Birth, Marriage and Death Records, Malden, Masschusetts, 1649-1850
"Sargent Family Histories by Elbert Thomas and Aaron Sargent.
New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Apr 1848, pg. 197,Charlestown Vital Records To 1850
The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, 2 Vols.....Wyman
THE WILL OF WILLIAM SARGEANT: (WILL AND INVENTORY...DOC #157)
(From the Plymouth Colony Records, at Plymouth, Book of Wills, Vol. 4th, Part 2d, p. 19.)
The book, "Who Begot Thee" by Gilbert Oliver Bent, 1903, pgs. 23-24.Sargent, Aaron,. Genealogy of the Sarge(a)nt family : descendents of William, of Malden, Mass.. Boston: S.G. Drake, 1858.Colonel Clergy of New England, by F.L. Weiss, 182
For additional information on William Sargeant, see ancestors, Hugh and Roger Sargeant.

In 1639, the year after William arrived in the American Colonies (Massachusetts), the first printing office was set up in America at Cambridge by Stephen Daye of Seabrook Connecticut.

In 1682, when William died, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was founded by William Penn.

William was baptized on June 20, 1602 at All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England.

PROFESSION - HAT MERCHANT (HABERDASHER OF HATS/HAT MAKER) AND YEOMAN

Some researchers show that William and Sarah had a son, William, but this has not been proven.
20 Jul 1626 - Northampton, Northamptonshire, England - Made a Freeman (called "Son of Roger Sargeant").
1632-1633 " " " Senior Bailiff
22 Jan 1636/37 - All Saints Church, Northampton, England - William Sargeant's name appears for the last time in the register of All Saints Church at the Baptism of daughter, Mary from his first Marriage.

Some sources show that William had two children born in England, Elizabeth and Hannah. These children must have been from either his first or second marriage.
1638 - Came to American Colonies, to Charlestown, then settled in Malden, (Mystic Side), Massachusetts. (across the Mystic River.) William's property was in what is NOW Everett, Masschussets.
10 Mar 1639 - William Sargeant was admitted to the church in Charlestown, Masschusetts. His wife Sarah was admitted the following Sunday. William's migration from this established life and subsequent occupation as Lay Preacher seems to indicate that he became a rather staunch Puritan.
May 2, 1639 - Made a Freeman in Charlestown, Masschusetts.
The following entry is found in Lechford's "Note Book", pg. 224 or the printed edition (Cambridge, 1885):"John Winthrop, Esqr. Governor of the Jurrisdiccon of the Massachusetts bay in New England to all manner of persons whome it may concerne greeting.....These are to certify you that William Sergeant late of Northampton, haber-dasher of Hatts and now of Charlestown in New England planter and Sarah his wife, late the wife of William Minshall of Whitchurch in the county of Salop gent., Deceased, are both blessed be God in full life and good health at the time of the making hereof In testimony whereof I have caused the publicke seale of our Colony to be hereto affixed the fourteenth day of November in the fifteenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of England &c Annoq'Dui 1639"1648-1650.....William Sargeant was Deacon and Lay Preacher in Malden, Massachusetts. His farm was in that part of Malden which was set off in 1870 as the town of Everett, (now a city). He was commonly called, "Reverand William Sargeant.1654..Purchased 8 acres of land from W. Johnson in Charlestown, Massachusetts. (See History of Malden below.)1656-1657..

William Sargeant and family moved to Barnstable, Massachusetts. He was a Freeman there in 1657 and also Lay Preacher in Barnstable, Massachusetts

The "History of Barnstable County, Massachusetts", edited by Simeon L. Deyo, states:When the number of freemen and voters was recorded in 1670, the commons meadows were ordered sold. The list of freemen and their widows included William Sargeant among others. (Pg. 379.)

On pg. 579 it states that the original name was Monomoyick, and the same year that Mr. Nickerson made his first purchase, the court at Plymouth granted to William Sargeant, among others, the right to purchase of the Indians, lands at Monomoyick and places adjacent.

According to "The Spragues of Malden, Massachusetts" by Chamberlain (pg. 65), the widow and children of Lt. Ralph Sprague appointed William Sargeant and two other men to appraise and apportion the estate of Lt. Ralph Sprague in 1650, which they did Information on William Sargeant from the Encyclopedia of Massachusetts-Biographical-Genealogical, Publ. The American Historical Society Inc. New York and Chicago Pg. 147-148, (Located at the Los Angeles Public Lib.):He (William Sargeant) was a man well calculated and accustomed by his previous standing in England for the office (of lay preacher in Malden) and Johnson, in his "Wonder-working Providence," states: "The people gathered into a church some distance of time before they could attain to any church officer to administer the Seals unto them, yet in the meantime at their Sabbath assemblies they had a godly Christian name Mr. Sargent who did preach the Word to them till 1650." His lands were situated in the southerly part of Mystic Side (or,as it was named in 1649, Malden), on the southerly slope of a hill (later called Belmont Hill), and about one and one-third miles northeast from the river. This land he held as early as 1640 (with the exception of three acres adjoining it, which he purchased in 1654), and it was in that part of Malden, which was afterwards set off, and in 1870 named "Everett" in honor of the distinguished Edward Everett. Upon this land stood the old homestead of the founder, a typical colonial residence, sturdily timbered, built to endure, and long an historic landmark of Massachusetts in the age of the pioneers. This homestead William Sargent bequeathed to his eldest son, John, who in turn divided its use between his sons, Jonathan and Ebenezer, "with all the Land adjoining thereunto, that was his (John's) father, William Sargeants."Still retaining his property at Malden, William Sargent, about the year 1656 or 1657, left that township and established his domicile in Barnstable, and on the 29th of the 4th month, 1658, gave power of attorney to Joseph Hills, a prominent resident of Malden, concerning his property at that place. In 1657 he was made a freeman of Plymouth Colony. In Barnstable, as in Malden, he was a lay preacher, and officiated in the pulpit formerly occupied by the Rev. Dr. Lothrop, deceased, in 1653. It is evident that he leased or rented his Malden property on his removal to Barnstable, for in 1661 he appears as plaintiff in a suit to recover his rent, and a lengthy document in the case, called "Articles of Agreement had, made and concluded on the first day of the 5th month, 1658, Betwixt William Sergeant of Barnstable in the Jurisdiccon of New Plymouth, on the one partie; and James Lane of Malden in the Massachusetts, on the other partie," sets forth under eleven "Items" the conditions of the contract.From a letter written by William Sargeant after his removal to Barnstable, to his friend, Mr. Joseph Hills, of Malden, of which the following is a copy, the annexed fac-simile of his signature was obtained. (see DOC file and FTM Scrapbook for copy of signature). The letter relates to the collection of the rent of a farm in Malden:Reut and Beloued Mr. Joseph Hills after my Xtian salute of yoer self and 2nd selfe with harty acknoledgmt of your curteous and liberal entertainment of vs always togethr with yor forward and ready mind upon al my addresses to bestead me at this distance I am yet further bold to acquaint you how it stands with mee in the point of James Lanes rent for this his last yeere 1660: giuing you a just acct of wt I have receiued.Impr of Henery Euans A Bill as you know to Capt Sauage £2-4-00 of Elcer when my sonn John was ther latter end of last yeer 2-3-00 of Elcer my wif took some smal things in our former jorney 0-8-05 and this time only 2 linen wheels, spinning wheels 0-10-00 ___________ som is £5-05-05
This is all I have recd of my eleuen pounds.I did confer with Job Lane and John Harris of winnisimnet who both referred me to Elcer of boston: affirming they had nothing in yr hands: for I addrest myself to Elcer who told mee he would answer as much as came to 2 pound in case I could stay vntil he culd speak with a certain pson: but I attended his leisure but could not find him at home anj more: he knew wel yt I was to be gone my journey he posest me also wth pmising words yt he would not stick to pay me al yt were behind of Lane's rent in case I would stay vntil he had bills in his hand to doe it I prest him at present but for a set of curtains and vallans for our bed hauing non at present: but I could not reuail: I prest for a little canvis and locarum but all in vain: Sir I doubt vnles you press hard on Job Lane and hold him vnto it I shall hardly attain vnto it: wch if you pleas to doe take 40s of it or wt you pleas to recompens your panes for I am verily agreiued and ashamed to put you upon this trauell and panes for mee soe frequently as I haue hitherto done and stil doe. Sir touching my farm I think Daniel must hold it at least for this yeere myne own condicon of settlemt remaining as yet so Arbitrary and doupfull our brethren intending so far as I can pceiue, another address vnto the Bay Messengers in order to settle things in peace and order amoung vs and I find not in ym a willingnes to release meevntil yt triall be made; after wch I shall wth the first optunity either come or send you an order wt to doe in meane time I entreat to aduis Daniel to be carful to prseru the fruit trees and wt els you think meet. Sir you maj convey either letter or anjthing ells to Mr. Mayor: with safty be sent vnto mee: the vessel being ready to pass awaj I am prest to be somwt inconsideratly breif.Comending you and all your affaires vnto the neur failing guidanee blessing and ptextion of the Albeing Alworking Jehouah: and Rest yors whil: mine: in body (signature) Willm Seargeant (See Media for this signature.)From Barnstab 4th mo. 61. 29th day (April 29, 1661)

ANNETTE CARROLL HAS A PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF WILLIAM SARGEANT'S SIGNATURE FROM THE ABOVE DOCUMENT AS WELL AS A PENCIL DRAWING OF HIS HOME AT "MYSTIC SIDE" (MALDEN, Massachusetts.) IN HER DOCUMENT FILE. BOTH HAVE BEEN SCANNED INTO THIS FAMILY TREE MAKER FILE, IN THE MEDIA SECTION.THE WILL OF WILLIAM SARGEANT: (WILL and INVENTORY...DOC #157)(From the Plymouth Colony Records, at Plymouth, Book of Wills, Vol. 4th, Part 2d, p. 19, the following was transcribed):(Original spelling used.)The last Will and Testament of Mr. William Serjant of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth, exhibited to the Court held att Plymouth aforsaid on the oathes of Mr. Thomas Hinckley assistant and John Chipman Elder as followeth;I William Sarjeant of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth being weak of body but by the Mercye of God of disposing mind and memory; and calling to mind the uncertainty of this Transitory life, and not knowing how soone it may please God to call mee hence, do therefore make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament, heerby revoakeing and adnulling all former and other will or wills heereterfore by mee made either by word or writing; and this only to be accoumpted and accepted as my last will and Testament as followeth.Item, I will and bequeath my soule to God in Jesus Christ my Deare Saviour and onely redeemer and my body to decent buriall; and as to my Temporall estate which God hath bin pleased far above my deserts, to bestow upon mee; my will is that first of all thatt all my just debts which I owe to any p'son or p'sons in right or consience shall be first discharged and satisfyed out of my estate by my executors heerafter named, within convenient time after my decease.Item I will and bequeath to Sarah my loveing wife all my household stuffe and two of my Cowes to be wholy att her dispose, and the use of the new end of my now dwelling house, or the use of one such Room of my house att Maulden, as shee shall chuse in case shee there desire to live during her natural life, and for the further support and stay of liveing I will unto her eight pounds pr annum in current Country pay, to be payed out of the proffitts of my lands by my two sons John and Samuell during her natural life, vid; my son John to pay six pounds therof and my son Samuel forty shillings therof yeerly, and every yeer during her natural life.Item I will and bequeath unto my son John Sergeant my house with all my lands att Maulden. To him and his heirs forever so as hee my said son his heires or assigns, doe well and truely pay or cause to be payed unto Sarah his mother the sume of six pounds pr annum as above mensioned, and after his said mothers decease, the sum of five pounds as a leganse which I will to be payed to my Daughter Hannah Feech within one full year after his mothers my said wife her decease; and five pounds as a legacse I give and bequeath to my Daughter Ruth Bourne within two yeers after my said wifes decease, and five pounds more to my said Daughter Ruth Bourne within three yeers after her my said wifes decease. These Legaces to be payed in currant countrye pay at price currant; as they shall grow due and payable;Item I will and bequeath unto my son Samuell Serjeant my now dwelling house with all my land in Barnstable to him and his heirs forever, so as hee the said Samuell his heirs or assigns doe well abd truely pay or cause to be payed unto the said Sarah is mother forty shillings pr annum in Current Country pay during her natural life, as aforsaid; also I will and bequeath to him the said Samuell my two oxen 2 cowes and a horse with my cart plow and other Tackling thereunto belonging, Item I will to Samuell Bill, my Grandson one heiffer or young horse, and my will is to leave all the rest of my estate in whatsoever it is unto my executors for the payment of my debts, and discharge of my funerall expenses, and I doe hereby appoint and declare Sarah my said loveing wife and my Son John Serjeant aforsaid to be my executors of this my last Will and Testament; and my loveing friends Elder John Chipman and Deacon William Crocker to be ouerseers to see this my last Will and Testament be performed, according to the true intent therof; in witness wherof I have heerunto sett my hand andseal this ninth day of Mach Anno Dom 1679/80 William Serjeant {Seal}Signed sealed and declaredIn presence of Thomas Hinckley John Chipman(It is very interesting to note that the two men William named as overseers of his Will, Elder John Chipman and Deacon William Crocker, are ancestors of Ted Smythe who with his wife, Barbara have been very close and loving friends of William Sargeant's decendant, Herbert Gerald Carroll and his wife, Annette (Strange) Carroll since the 1970s.)The Inventory was sworn to March 3d, 1682/3, and amounted to L309.14.9."The House and land at Maulden according to the information we have from John Searjeant, besides what John Sarjeant hath added to it L176.00.00."WILLIAM SARGEANT'S WILL INVENTORY:A true inventory of all and regular the goods and chattels and credditts of Mr. William Sarjeant, deceased, appraised att his house in Barnstable the six and twentyth day of February, one thousand six hundred eithty and two by James Lewis and Joseph Haythorpe and exhibited to the court of his Matie (Majestie) held at Plymouth the sixth of March Anno dom 1682/1683. Pounds Shillings PenceItem his Purse and Apparell 07 05 00 " his books 04 06 00 " 2 oxen 06 00 00 " 4 Cowes 09 00 00 " two Cowes att Linn 04 10 00 " 1-3 year old heiffer 01 15 00 " 2-two year old Meat Cattle 02 10 00 " 2 Calves 01 05 00 " 6 sheep and 5 lambes a year ol 02 15 00 " 2 mares 01 10 00 " 1 marre and a horse Colt 01 00 00 " in (?) swine 01 40 00 " a parte in a smale old hay boate 01 17 00 " 1 bed and beding and bedsted 04 10 00 " 1 bed and beding 03 00 00 " 1 bed and beding 04 00 00 " 1 Fliche bed 00 10 00 " one spinning (Cinnil?) 03 10 00 " a piece of New broad clot 01 10 00 " in pewter 01 12 00 " in tining ware 00 05 00 " in brass ware 03 05 00 " in Iron pott and kettle and pothoo 00 12 00 " in other Iron ware 01 03 00 " in armes and amunition 00 17 00 " in earthin ware 00 02 03 " in Chests boxes and cubbard 01 04 00 " 2 silver spoones and 3 old alcomy spoones 00 12 06 " in Tubbs, pailes and old barrells 00 18 06 " a smoothing Iron Glasse bottles and seives 00 06 06 " in Chairs and Cushins 00 08 00 " in 2 bed steads 00 13 00 " an old Gridiron, old bellowes, a Cowbel and an old sythe 00 06 00 " a spinning wheel, a hatchill and a lamp00 02 00 " a parcell of sheep woole and some other old thinges 00 06 00 " a Cart and wheels, plow, Irons, a Chaine and draught Geares 03 00 00 " some other old things 00 02 00 " in corn and other provisions that the family will need before a New supply will come 06 00 00 " the house and land in Barnstable 50 00 00 " the house and land at Maulden according to the information wee have from John Serjeant besides what John Serjeant hath added to it 176 00 00 " an old frying pan, pestill and spice morter 00 02 06 Som totall 309 14 09The estate is Indebted according as wee are informed by John Serjeant amountsto ........................................................ 18 10 0 Joseph Caythorpe James LewisSamuell Sarjeant appeered and took oath that this is a true Inventory of his deceased father's estate so farr as he knowes this third of March 1682 (1683) Before mee Barnabas Caythorp Assistant

THE "HAY BOATE" MENTIONED IN THE INVENTORY ABOVE WAS USED IN OBTAINING SALT HAY FROM THE SALT MARSHES THAT SURROUND BARNSTABLE, MASS. IT GREW WILD AND WAS USED TO FEED THEIR CATTLE. THE SALT HAY MARSHES STILL EXSIST TODAY IN LARGE NUMBER AND WERE SEEN BY HERBERT AND ANNETTE CARROLL ON A VISIT TO BARNSTABLE AND THE CAPE COD AREA IN MASSACHUSETTS IN JUNE, 1991.(The following is taken from GENEOLOGY OF THE SARGEANT FAMILY, DECENDANTS OF WILLIAM OF MALDEN, MASS. by Aaron Sargent, 1858, pg. 11 and 12. A photocopy of this book is in the possession of Annette Strange Carroll.)The farm at Malden, given to John Sargent, in the will was owned by William as early as 1649,--and perhaps earlier,--with the exception of eight acres southwest of and adjoining his own land, which he purchased in 1654. It was on a hill in the southerly part of the town, about one and a half miles northeast from Malden Bridge, and is now intersected by the Newburyport turnpike.John, by deed of gift, in 1708, gave part of the house, (balance of house to his wife, in his will,) and "all the land adjoining that was my father William Sargeant's" to his sons Jonathan and Ebenezer, who divided the same in 1720; Jonathan then retaining the southerly portion, with parts of the buildings, and Ebenezer retaining the northerly portion, with the "east ends" of the buildings. Jonathan, in 1735, gave a quarter of an acre of his part, "in the southerly part of Malden," "being part of my homestead whereon now I dwell," with a road twenty-six feet wide to the highway, to the "Inhabitants of the southerly part of Malden for a Meeting House."Ebenezer, in 1736, sold land "received from my father by deed of gift, being the homestead;" and describes it as being bounded on the south and southwest by the Meetinghouse and the way to the Meetinghouse; and, as his part of the estate was the northerly part, it may be inferred that the Meetinghouse was near the centre of the whole farm. Near the former site of the Meetinghouse, and south from it, now stands an old, dilapidated, unpainted house, which, there is much reason for believing, was the residence of the first three generations of the family. It certainly was occupied by members of the three succeeding generations. No part of the place is now in the possession of any member of the family.William Sargeant is buried in the Lothrop Hill Cemetery in Barnstable, Mass. on Routh 6A. He is buried in a mass grave along with the original settlers and their Pastor, Rev. Lothrop. They had been originally buried at "Calves Pasture" where the first Meeting House was. This was located where the Lothrop Hill Cem. now stands. Annette and Herbert (Jerry) Carroll have a photograph of the common marker of this mass grave at the cemetery, taken during a visit to Barnstable, Mass. in June 1991. The Tercentenary marker on the stone wall reads: Grave of John Lothrop (etc). Also graves of first settlers removed from Calves Pasture Point. (from "The Seven Villages of Barnstable" 1976 Pg.60-62 - Publ. by the Town of Barnstable)Rev. Lothrop came to Barnstable with his church congregation from Scituate, Mass. After the death of Rev. Lothrop in 1653, William Sargeant was one of the men who filled the pulpit before a new pastor was called. William was called by the conservative element of the church. (From Barnstable, Three Centuries of a Cape Cod Town, Donald G. Trayser, pg. 19)During a visit in June 1991, Herbert and Annette also worshipped at the West Parish Church, West Barnstable, Mass., which is the outgrowth of the original Meeting House where William Sargeant was Lay Preacher in Barnstable.Annette Carroll and her good friend, Barbara Smythe, were also able to do research during that time at the Sturgis Library in Barnstable (originally the home of Rev. Lothrop).

MUCH IS WRITTEN ABOUT WILLIAM SARGENT OF MALDEN, MASSACHUSETTS. ANNETTE (STRANGE) CARROLL HAS MANY COPIES OF MATERIALS CONCERNING HIM IN HER POSSESSION INCLUDING PARISH RECORDS FROM ENGLAND, HIS WILL AND INVENTORY AND OTHER PAPERS.Children of William and Hannah Sargeant: (From "English Ancestry") Hannah b. in England, M. in 1649, Hency Felch (Feech), of Reading; d. 15 Dec 1717 Elizabeth(1) b. in England, m. about 1651, David Nicols; m. 14 Jan 1652/3, Thomas Bill of Boston; d. 5 Mar 1657/8 Elizabeth(2) MaryChildren of William and Mary/Marie Sargeant:Mary, b. 1634/37 and baptized January 22, 1636/37, All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. She died in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts November, 1671. When she was age 20, she married Allen Breed in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts. Her ancestor, Kristin C. Hall, e-mail addr.,Kristen@media.mit.edu. She also has a website on the familyBook: Who Begot Thee? (found on Googlebooks). By Gilbert Oliver Bent, 1903. (Biography of the Sargent Family): "William Sargent, 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, (who was son of Hugh), the Mayor of Northhampton, England, in 1626. Hugh Sargent married Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Gifford of the ancient and distinguish family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in September 1632. Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, co of Salop, gentleman and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire*. William Sargent came to America from Northhampton, England in 1638 with his newly married wife Sarah and two daughters by his first wife. He settled in Charlestown, (MA), in that part which afterwards became the town of Malden, (MA), where he was a lay preacher in 1648-50. He was also a Deacon and active citizen. He removed to Barnstable, (MA), Dec 16, 1682. His widow died January 12, 1689. Hannah Sargent, 1629-1717. Daughter of William (and first wife, Hannah). Born in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 to Henry Felch. Died December 15, 1717. Her sister (half-sister), Ruth, married (1) Jonathan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, who's first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came over in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth Chipman died in Sandwich, (MA), in 1713. In her will she left her bequests to "the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading".Information regarding the history of Malden, Massachusetts:History of MaldenIt's hard to imagine now, but over 300 years ago, English scouting parties moved cautiously through an unknown wilderness. Today, the wilderness has evolved into the bustling city of Malden. In 1629, a section of hilly woodlands north of the Mystic River, was purchashed from the Pawtucket Indians, and called Mystic Side. It was incorporated into the township of Charlestown. But by 1649, residents of Mystic Side had petitioned the General Court to let them form a separate township, to be called Malden. The town was named after a community of the same name in Essex, England. Some of the most prominent citizens of Malden, Massachusetts had emigrated from that English town.By the early eighteenth century, Malden Village was, according to an English visitor, "fruitful and well cultivated, being entirely cleared and enclosed with stone fences." In order to survive, the citizens of the new village had to be resourceful.Besides engaging in farming, they were also fishermen on the Mystic River, and worked as woodsmen in north Malden. Inhabitants numbered aound 1000 at the time. During the revolutionary period, citizens of Malden were early activists in the struggle against the oppression of England. In 1770 they voted to stop using tea until the notorious Revenue Acts were repealed.In fact, Malden was the first town in the Commonwealth to petition the Colonial Government to secede from England.
found on ancestry.com


REVEREND WILLIAM SARGENT (1602-1682) - Northampton, Northamptonshire, England;
Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts; Malden, Middlesex county, Massachusetts;
Barnstable, Plymouth county, Massachusetts
(Third Generation - Sargent Family)
FATHER MOTHER
ROGER SARGENT ELLEN MAKERNES
BIRTH AND BAPTISM
William was born in 1602 and was baptized in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England on 20 June 1602[6].
DEATH AND BURIAL
He died in Barnstable, Barnstable county, Massachusetts on 16 December 1682; he was 80[6].
OCCUPATION AND CHURCH MEMBERSHIP
William was first a haberdasher. When he migrated to New England, he became first a deacon and later a lay preacher at Malden, Middlesex county, Massachusetts and Barnstable, Plymouth county, Massachusetts[6,9]. Even though he was a lay preacher, he is commonly referred to as "Reverend William Sargent". He was admitted to the church in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts on 10 March 1638/9[9,13]. His migration from his English established life and
subsequent occupation as a lay preacher seem to indicate that William became a rather staunch Puritan.
TOWN SERVICE
He appeared to first follow in his father's political footsteps and was elected Senior Bailiff of Northampton in 1632-3.
FREEMANSHIP
William first made Freeman in England at Northampton on 20 July 1626, at which time he is called the "son of Roger Sargent"[6]. In America, William took the Oath of Freeman on 2
May 1639 in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts[10,11,12] and made freeman in Plymouth Colony in 1657[9].
RESIDENCES AND MIGRATION
Like his father, he lived in All Saints parish, Northamptonshire, England[6]. His name appears for the last time in the parish register of All Saints on 22 January 1636/7 at the baptism of his
daughter Mary[6]. Although the details of his migration are currently lost, he had settled in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts by 1638/9. He was still in Charlestown in 1654, when he bought 8 & MIGRATION 1638/9. He was still in Charlestown in 1654, when he bought 8 acres from W. Johnson[13]. He later removed to Malden, Middlesex county, Massachusetts -- which is the part of Malden that became the city of Everett. Finally, he removed to Barnstable,
Barnstable county, Massachusetts in 1656 or 1657[9].
ESTATE
William's will was written on 9 March 1679/80 and is also reprinted in Aaron Sargent's book[9]. The will was proven on 3 March 1682/3 and devised to his wife and six children[13].
MARRIAGE #1
Circa 1627 when William was 25, he first married Hannah [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21]. Hannah died
in 1632 and was buried on 25 September 1632 in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14].
CHILDREN
28. i. Elizabeth1 SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
29. ii. Hannah SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
30. iii. Elizabeth2 SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
31. iv. Mary SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
MARRIAGE
#2 Circa 1634 when William was 32, he second married Mary/Marie [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14,22,18,23,24]. She died circa 1637 in
Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6].
CHILDREN
32. i. Mary SARGENT Please see her own page.
33. ii. Sarah SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
MARRIAGE
#3 Sometime before 17 March 1638/9, when "Rev. William Serjeant" was 36, he third married Sarah [surname not known], in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts [6,13,14,18,24,25,26,27,28,29,30]. She was admitted to the church at Charlestown on 17 March 1638/9[9,13].
CHILDREN
34. i. John SARGENT - John was born in 1639 and baptized in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts on 8d:10m (December):1639.
35. ii. Ruth SARGENT - Ruth was born in 28d:8m(October):1642 in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts
36. iii. Samuel SARGENT - Samuel was born on 3d:1m (March):1644/5 in Charlestown,
Suffolk county, Massachusetts
SOURCES 1. Edward Carroll Death Record, 19 October 1899, Lynn, Essex
county, Massachusetts, 1866, 192, p. 186, #337.
found on ancestry.com


Who Begot Thee? Some Genealogical and Historical Notes Made in an Effort (Sargent Family)
1602-1713, England to Malden, Massachusetts
Book: Who Begot Thee? (found on Googlebooks)

"William Sargent. 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, who was son of Hugh, the Mayor of Northhampton, England, in 1626. Hugh Sargent married Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Gifford of the ancient and distinguish family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in September 1632. Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, co of Salop, gentleman and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire*. William Sargent came to America from Northhampton, England in 1638 with his newly married wife Sarah and two daughters by his first wife. He settled in Charlestown, in that part which afterwards became the town of Malden, where he was a lay preacher in 1648-50. He was also a Deacon and active citizen. He removed to Barnstable December 16, 1682. His widow died January 12, 1689.

HANNAH SARGENT. 1629-1717. Daughter of William. Born in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 to Henry Felch. Died December 15, 1717. Her sister Ruth, married (1) Jonathan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, who's first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came over in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth Chipman died in Sandwich in 1713. In her will she left her bequests to "the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading."
Pages 23-24
found on ancestry.com


Reverend William Sargent 1600's, England and Massachusetts
Rev. William Sargent (1602-1694)

William was first a haberdasher (hat maker). When he migrated to New England, he became a deacon and later a lay preacher at Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and Barnstable, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Even though he was a lay preacher, he is commonly referred to as "Reverend William Sargent". He was admitted to the church in Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts on 10 March 1638/9. His migration from his English established life and subsequent occupation as a lay preacher seem to indicate that William became a rather staunch Puritan.

He appeared to first follow in his father's political footsteps and was elected Senior Bailiff of Northampton in 1632-3.William first made Freeman in England at Northampton on 20 July 1626, at which time he is called the "son of Roger Sargent". In America, William took the Oath of Freeman on 2 May 1639 in Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts and made freeman in Plymouth Colony in 1657.

Like his father, he lived in All Saints parish, Northamptonshire, England. His name appears for the last time in the parish register of All Saints on 22 January 1636/7 at the baptism of his daughter Mary. Although the details of his migration are currently lost, he had settled in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts by 1638/9.

Circa 1627 when William was 25, he first married Hannah [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. Hannah died in 1632 and was buried on 25 September 1632 in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. They had 4 daughters.

Circa 1634 when William was 32, he second married Mary/Marie [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14,22,18,23,24]. She died circa 1637 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. They had two daughters, Mary and Sarah.

Sometime before 17 March 1638/9, when "Rev. William Serjeant" was 36, he third married Sarah [surname not known], in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts. She was admitted to the church at Charlestown on 17 March 1638/9. They had two sons, John and Samuel, and one daughter, Ruth.

William's will was written on 9 March 1679/80 and is also reprinted in Aaron Sargent's book, Sargent Genealogy of 1895. The will was proven on 3 March 1682/3 and devised to his wife and six children.
found on ancestry.com


Plymouth County History 1682, Barnstable
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691
Part Three: Biographical Sketches
Biographical Sketches
Sargent, Williamxxx —Baptized at Northampton, Northamptonshire, on 20 June 1602, William Sargent died at Barnstable, 16 December 1682. His first wife Hannah _____ died in England, as did probably his second wife Mary _____. He was last recorded in England on 22 January 1636/37 (baptism of a daughter) and first recorded in New England at Charlestown, where he and his third wife Sarah were admitted as church members 10 March 1638/39. An entry in Lechford's Notebook, p. 224, gives a certificate by Governor Winthrop regarding William Sargent of Charlestown, a haberdasher of hats, from Northampton, England, and his wife Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, County Salop. Sargent moved first to Malden, and then, ca. 1656 or 1657, to Barnstable. He was made a Bay freeman in 1639 and was a lay preacher in Malden and Barnstable. G. Andrews Moriarty gives documentary evidence in a series of articles in NEHGR 74:231, 267, 75:57, 129, 79:358, tracing William Sargent's line back to English royalty.
found on ancestry.com


William Sargent, First American Ancestor 1638, Charlestown, Massachusetts
From Sargent Geneaology
American Lineage chapter
William Sargent, the ancestor of the family in America, came from Northampton, In England, to Charlestown, in New England with his third wife, Sarah, and two daughters by his first wife, in 1638.

The plantation at Salem had been begun in 1628 by John Endicott and others, who came over from England to make preparations for the settlement of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Several persons, by his permission, travelled in a westerly direction about 12 miles through the woods and came to a neck of land between the Charles and Mystic Rivers, called by the natives Mishawum. Having obtained consent, they settled there and agreed to call the new settlement Charlestown. As early as 1629 Ralph Sprague and others, living in Charlestown, crossed the river to explore the country, and found an uncouth wilderness inhabited by the Pawtucket Indians. A settlement was afterwards made at Mystic Side, that is on the north side of Mystic River, as a part of Charlestown, and William Sargent and his family made their domicile there. He was admitted to the church in Charlestown, March 10, 1638/9; and his wife was admitted the following Sunday. He was made a freeman of Massachusetts Bay Colony the same year.

William’s farm was in the southerly part of Mystic Side, or Malden, on the southerly slope of a hill, afterwards called Belmont Hill, about one and a third miles northeast from the river. The farm was owned by him as early as 1640 with the exception of 8 acres southwest of and adjoining the original farm, which he purchased in 1654. It was on both sides of what was afterwards the Newburyport Turnpike, which having been abandoned as a turnpike, became a town highway, called Broadway. This part of the town was set off from Malden in 1870 and named Everett in honor of Edward Everett, the distinguished statesman and orator. The town was incorporated as a city in 1893.
(See illustration of house at Mystic Side.)

The picture presented is of the house built by William Sargent, and bequeathed by him in his will to his son John. If it is not an exact representation, it has the merit of being as near. . .to the original. . . The right-hand or east part of the picture, including the door and chimney was standing until about 1890 and the picture is from a photographic copy.
found on ancestry.com


The Sargent Family Worthy of Note The Sargent family is worthy of note as one of the very few colonial fully proven to be of royal descent. This was demonstrated with great detail and accuaracy by G. Andrews Moriarty, one America's greatest genealogists, in a series of articals in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 74:231-237; 75:57-63; and 79:358-378. As a result of Moriarty's research, the line of Reverend William Sargent of Charlestown, Massachusetts Bay Colony, can be traced back generation by generation to King Alfred the Great.

"The marriage of William Sargent's son, John Sargent, to Lydia Chapman, daughter of John and Hope (Howland) Chipman, and granddaughter of Pilgrims John and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland, united a Pilgrim line with a royal English line. William Sargent, the first of the line in America, a lay minister, was by trade a haberdasher, and by rank a gentleman. One of the biggest hurdles in colonial genalogy is to bridge the gap of the Atlantic and positively prove that the American immigrant is identical with a person in England. This is done for the Reverend William Sargent by an entry in Lechford's "Notebook," Cambridge,1885, pg. 224, where Governor John Winthrop mentions 'William Sargent late of Northhampton [England], haberdasher of Hatts and now of Charlestown in New England.' Winthrop refers to him by the title 'gentleman'. A parish record of Courteenhall, near Northampten, in Northampton, in Northamptonshire, England, helps connect William Sargent to his grandmother, Margaret Gifford, a member of the noble Gifford (or Giffard) family which Moriaty calls 'one of the most ancient and distinguished families of England'. Margaret's father, Nichcolas Gifford, was listed in 1538 one of the gentlemen to attend upon King Henry VIII's household. He was an assistant to Thomas Cromwell in the dissolution of the monastaries. His grandfather married Agnes Winslow, of an armigerous Winslow family which genealogists have been trying in vain for many years to show show as ancestors of Plymouth Governor Edward Winslow. Through Agnes Winslow, the Gifford family goes back to the family of Sir John Throckmorton who was Under- Treasurer of England in the reign of King Henry VI. The Throckmorton family at one time was thought to descend through a female (Bedsford) linefrom a royal line going back to William the Conqueror. Serious doubt has been caste on a vital connection of this line in a recent article in The Genealogist, 1:27. Although the line is still found in the 5th edition of Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists, 1976, Baltimore, it will be cut in the next edition.

"Carrying the Giffords still further back, we find that John Gifford's great, great-grandfather married Lucy de Morteymn and Moriarty in his articles, as well as Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists, demonstrate that she was a great (5 times) granddaughter of Gospatric II, 2nd Earl of Dunbar, whose paternal grandfather, Maldred, was a brother of King Duncan, who had been murdered by his cousin Macbeth. Gospatric II's great grandmother was Elgiva, the daughter of King Ethelred II, whose great, great-grandfather was King Alfred the Great.

"Lucy de Morteyn's husband was Sir John Gifford, whose great, great-grandfather, Elias Giffard, married Matilda FitzHarding, of the family which owned Berkeley Castle, where King Edward II was murdered. Elias'es mother, Berta, was one of the noble Clifford family, and a great-aunt of 'Fair Rosamund' the ill-fated mistress of of King Henry II. Elias'es great-grandfather, Osbern Giffard, was believed, but not with complete certainty, to have been with William the Conquerer at the Battle of Hastings. Moriarty once though Osbern was a younger brother to Walter Giffard, who was known to have fought at Hastings, but both Moriaty and Sir Anthony Wagner, Garter King of Arms, later came to believe that Osbern was Walter's nephew.

"The myriad of strands from this Sargent-Gifford line provide a fascinating interconnecting fabric spreading all over the history of England. One more example of these interesting connections can be seen in the background of Matilda FitzHarding, mentioned above, whose great-gandfather, Harding, was son of Eadnoth, the Saxon staller, or chamberlain, of King Edward the Confessor. The line going back to Eadnoth is Not a royal line, which makes it of special note.
[Source: L. G. Pine's "Sons of the Conqueror", Charles Tuttle Co., 1973, page 98]
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3 comments:

  1. Arn & Jody,

    Could you please contact me at jandjself@1starnet.com JoLynn Self

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow
    Hugh Sargeant is my 16th great grandfather
    Thank you xxx
    mariechamberlain@live.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very nice, Williams is my 9th g.grandfather

    Liz Nichols

    ReplyDelete