Saturday, August 13, 2011

GILBERT BICKMORE 1827-1896

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, father of Thomas Bickmore, father of Gilbert Bickmore.]

GILBERT MONTIER LAFAYETTE BICKMORE
Member of the Mormon Battalion from July 16, 1846 to July 16, 1847
Gilbert Montier Lafayette Bickmore is my 1st cousin 3 times removed. He was the son of Thomas Bickmore and Christina Bagley, who was the son of David Bickmore, the father of Isaac Motor Bickmore, the father of Isaac Danford Bickmore, the father of Mary Elizabeth Bickmore, the mother of Beth Schow, the mother of me, JoAnn Stagge Miller.

Gilbert Bickmore was born 20 July 1827 and died 4 February 1896 near Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California. He was buried on 4 February 1896 in Arroyo Grande Cemetery in San Luis Obispo, California.

He was a private in the Mormon Battalion, Company A, with Jefferson Hunt as his captain.

I found this at: http://wiki.hanksplace.net/images/6/63/Mormon_battalion_roster.pdf

He mustered out with Company A on July 16, 1847, at Los Angeles, California. (found at http://iagenweb.org/pottawattamie/mil/mormon-battalion-A.htm)

He married Katherine Huntsman in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1849, so he must have gone back for her.

They had six children: Eliza Ann, Amanda Delia, Christina Hannah, Mary Catherine, Gilbert Montier Lafayette, and James William.

It looks like he settled in San Bernardino. "It was natural those chosen to help form the new settlement would include men acquainted with the terrain between Utah and the west coast, and also those capable of supervising a venture of such magnitude. Thus some members of the Mormon Battalion and Mississippi Saints were selected. Among the Mormon Battalion men who resided in San Bernardino (1851-1858) were Elijah Allen, James Bailey, W. E. Beckstead, Gilbert Bickmore, Thomas Bingham, Abner Blackburn, Henry G. Boyle, Montgomery Button, James Clift, Robert Clift, Foster Curtis, Robert C. Egbert, Ebenezer Hanks, Silas Harris, James P. Hirons, Lucas Hoagland, Gilbert Hunt, Jefferson Hunt, Marshall Hunt, Jesse D. Hunter, William Hyde, David H. Jones, Andrew Lytle, Peter J. Mesick, Harley Mowrey, Calvin Reed, John Henry Rol[p.367] lins, Levi Runyon, M. L. Shepherd, William McIntyre, James Stewart, Stephen M. St. John, Rufus Stoddard, Nathan Swarthout, Truman Swarthout, Myron Tanner and Albert Tanner. (See Mormon Battalion DUP publication)."

THE MORMON BATTALION

In July 1846, under the authority of U.S. Army Captain James Allen and with the encouragement of Mormon leader Brigham Young, the Mormon Battalion was mustered in at Council Bluffs, Iowa Territory. The battalion was the direct result of Brigham Young's correspondence on 26 January 1846 to Jesse C. Little, presiding elder over the New England and Middle States Mission. Young instructed Little to meet with national leaders in Washington, D.C., and to seek aid for the migrating Latter-day Saints, the majority of whom were then in the Iowa Territory. In response to Young's letter, Little journeyed to Washington, arriving on 21 May 1846, just eight days after Congress had declared war on Mexico.

Little met with President James K. Polk on 5 June 1846 and urged him to aid migrating Mormon pioneers by employing them to fortify and defend the West. The president offered to aid the pioneers by permitting them to raise a battalion of five hundred men, who were to join Colonel Stephen W. Kearny, Commander of the Army of the West, and fight for the United States in the Mexican War. Little accepted this offer.

Colonel Kearny designated Captain James Allen, later promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, to raise five companies of volunteer soldiers from the able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and forty-five in the Mormon encampments in Iowa. On 26 June 1846 Allen arrived at the encampment of Mt. Pisgah. He was treated with suspicion as many believed that the raising of a battalion was a plot to bring trouble to the migrating Saints.

Allen journeyed from Mt. Pisgah to Council Bluffs, where on 1 July 1846 he allayed Mormon fears by giving permission for the Saints to encamp on United States lands if the Mormons would raise the desired battalion. Brigham Young accepted this, recognizing that the enlistment of the battalion was the first time the government had stretched forth its arm to aid the Mormons.

On 16 July 1846 some 543 men enlisted in the Mormon Battalion (Officially the 1st Iowa Volunteers). From among these men Brigham Young selected the commissioned officers; they included Jefferson Hunt, Captain of Company A; Jesse D. Hunter, Captain of Company B; James Brown, Captain of Company C; Nelson Higgins, Captain of Company D; and Daniel C. Davis, Captain of Company E. Among the most prominent non-Mormon military officers immediately associated with the battalion march were Lt. Col. James Allen, First Lt. Andrew Jackson Smith, Lt. Col. Philip St. George Cooke, and Dr. George Sanderson. Also accompanying the battalion were approximately thirty-three women, twenty of whom served as laundresses, and fifty-one children.

The battalion marched from Council Bluffs on 20 July 1846, arriving on 1 August 1846 at Fort Leavenworth (Kansas), where they were outfitted for their trek to Santa Fe. Battalion members drew their arms and accouterments, as well as a clothing allowance of forty-two dollars, at the fort. Since a military uniform was not mandatory, many of the soldiers sent their clothing allowances to their families in the Mormon refugee encampments in Iowa.

Each soldier was issued the following: 1 Harpers Ferry smoothbore musket, 1 infantry cartridge box, 1 cartridge box plate, 1 cartridge box belt, 1 bayonet scabbard, 1 bayonet scabbard belt, 1 bayonet scabbard belt plate, 1 waist belt, 1 waist belt plate, 1 musket gun sling, 1 brush and pike set, 1 musket screwdriver, 1 musket wiper, 1 extra flint cap. Each company was also allotted 5 sabers for the officers, 10 musket ball screws, 10 musket spring vices, and 4 Harpers Ferry rifles.

Battalion members took cash in lieu of uniforms, using the money to support their families and their church during a very hard period. Consequently, they did not wear uniforms. The uniform collection shown here is in a private collection. It shows the uniforms that the battalion would have worn had they been issued. The owner of these uniforms often shows them off at gun shows. Click on the image for more info.

The march from Fort Leavenworth was delayed by the sudden illness of Colonel Allen. Capt. Jefferson Hunt was instructed to begin the march to Santa Fe; he soon received word that Colonel Allen was dead. Allen's death caused confusion regarding who should lead the battalion to Santa Fe. Lt. A.J. Smith arrived from Fort Leavenworth claiming the lead, and he was chosen the commanding officer by the vote of battalion officers. The leadership transition proved difficult for many of the enlisted men, as they were not consulted about the decision.

Smith and his accompanying surgeon, a Dr. Sanderson, have been described in journals as the "heaviest burdens" of the battalion. Under Smith's dictatorial leadership and with Sanderson's antiquated prescriptions, the battalion marched to Santa Fe. On this trek the soldiers suffered from excessive heat, lack of sufficient food, improper medical treatment, and forced long-distance marches.

The first division of the Mormon Battalion approached Santa Fe on 9 October 1846. Their approach was heralded by Col. Alexander Doniphan, who ordered a one-hundred-gun salute in their honor. At Santa Fe, Smith was relieved of his command by Lt. Col. Philip St. George Cooke. Cooke, aware of the rugged trail between Santa Fe and California and also aware that one sick detachment had already been sent from the Arkansas River to Fort Pueblo in Colorado, ordered the remaining women and children to accompany the sick of the battalion to Pueblo for the winter. Three detachments consisting of 273 people eventually were sent to Pueblo for the winter of 1846-47.

The remaining soldiers, with four wives of officers, left Santa Fe for California on 19 October 1846. They journeyed down the Rio Grande del Norte and eventually crossed the Continental Divide on 28 November 1846. While moving up the San Pedro River in present-day Arizona, their column was attacked by a herd of wild cattle. In the ensuing fight, a number of bulls were killed and two men were wounded. Following the "Battle of the Bulls," the battalion continued their march toward Tucson, where they anticipated a possible battle with the Mexican soldiers garrisoned there. At Tucson, the Mexican defenders temporarily abandoned their positions and no conflict ensued.

On 21 December 1846 the battalion encamped on the Gila River. They crossed the Colorado River into California on 9 and 10 January 1847. By 29 January 1847 they were camped at the Mission of San Diego, about five miles from General Kearny's quarters. That evening Colonel Cooke rode to Kearny's encampment and reported the battalion's condition. On 30 January 1847 Cooke issued orders enumerating the accomplishments of the Mormon Battalion. "History may be searched in vain for an equal march of infantry. Half of it has been through a wilderness where nothing but savages and wild beasts are found, or deserts where, for lack of water, there is no living creature."

During the remainder of their enlistment, some members of the battalion were assigned to garrison duty at either San Diego, San Luis Rey, or Ciudad de los Angeles. Other soldiers were assigned to accompany General Kearny back to Fort Leavenworth. All soldiers, whether en route to the Salt Lake Valley via Pueblo or still in Los Angeles, were mustered out of the United States Army on 16 July 1847. Eighty-one men chose to reenlist and serve an additional eight months of military duty under Captain Daniel C. Davis in Company A of the Mormon Volunteers. The majority of the soldiers migrated to the Salt Lake Valley and were reunited with their pioneering families.

The men of the Mormon Battalion are honored for their willingness to fight for the United States as loyal American citizens. Their march of some 2,000 miles from Council Bluffs to California is one of the longest military marches in history. Their participation in the early development of California by building Fort Moore in Los Angeles, building a courthouse in San Diego, and making bricks and building houses in southern California contributed to the growth of the West.

Following their discharge, many men helped build flour mills and sawmills in northern California. Some of them were among the first to discover gold at Sutter's Mill. Men from Captain Davis's Company A were responsible for opening the first wagon road over the southern route from California to Utah in 1848.

Historic sites associated with the battalion include the Mormon Battalion Memorial Visitor's Center in San Diego, California; Fort Moore Pioneer Memorial in Los Angeles, California; and the Mormon Battalion Monument in Memory Grove, Salt Lake City, Utah. Monuments relating to the battalion are also located in New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado, and trail markers have been placed on segments of the battalion route.

The image to the right is of a Battalion flag owned by, and is in the possession of, a descendant of a battalion soldier. I don't have information on who the descendant (or the ancestor) is, but I believe the owner is in Salt Lake City, Utah. I assume that this flag was carried on the march. A Battalion member named Daniel Tyler wrote the book A Concise History of the Mormon Battalion in the Mexican War (available from http://www.mormonbattalion.com/) in which he described a reunion of Battalion members held in Salt Lake. The reunion was also attended by Brigham Young and other LDS leaders. Mentioned in the reunion chapter is a Battalion flag with an image of Abraham's ram in a thicket. That flag symbolized the Battalion as a sacrifice which saved the church just as Abraham's ram was a sacrifice which saved Isaac's life and his posterity (Genesis 22:1-12). The flag shown here clearly is not the reunion flag. I've never seen a picture of the reunion flag and have never seen any reference to it other than in Taylor's book. I'd sure like to know if this flag still exists. I assume that the reunion flag was created some time after the Battalion was discharged.

The image to the right is of a nine-foot-long Battalion flag reportedly was used by the Nauvoo Legion in Nauvoo, Illinois and later presented by Brigham young to the Mormon Battalion for their march to fight in the war with Mexico. It is believed to be the flag raised by the Mormon Battalion at Camp Moore, Los Angeles, California on July 4, 1847. When Battalion members rejoined the body of the Saints (by then in Salt Lake City), the flag was presented to Brigham Young. See "Secrets of the patriarch's bear flag" for more information.

Gilbert Montier Lafayette Bickmore was born 20 July 1827 in Morganvile, Scott, Ilinois, and died 4 February 1896 in Arroyo Grande, San Louis Obispo, California. He was buried February 1896 in Pioneer Cemetery, Wattsonville, Santa Cruz, California. He was the son of William M. Bickmore and Christina Bagley.

Katherine J. Huntsman was born 27 September 1824 in Perry, Richland, Ohio, and died 24 December 1903 in Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California. She was buried December 1903 in Arroyo Grande Ce, San Luis Obispo, California. She was the daughter of James W. Huntsman and Mary Johnston.

Children of Katherine J. HUNTSMAN and Gilbert Montier Lafayette BICKMORE are:

i. Eliza Ann Bickmore was born 28 November 1851 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, and died 19 June 1942 in Oakland, Alameda, California. She married Moses Montgomery Ayers 22 February 1873 in Bakersfield, Kern, California, son of Zina G. AYERS and Mary HARGROVE. He was born 11 February 1849 in Spring Hill, Livingston, Missouri, and died 11 March 1932 in Salinas, Monterey, California.

ii. Amanda Delia Bickmore was born 9 March 1854/1855 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California, and died 21 June 1914 in Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California. She married James Simpkins Brooks 5 January 1873 in Bakersfield, Kern, California. He was born 17 August 1848 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died 9 September 1940 in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo, California.

iii. Christina Hannah Bickmore was born 28 February 1860 in Watsonville, Santa Cruz, California, and died 13 July 1924 in Gilroy, Santa Clara, California. She married Preston Thomas Stewart 18 May 1878 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. He was born 6 May 1853 in Provo, Utah, Utah, and died 21 August 1930 in Redlands, San Bernardino, California.

iv. Mary K. Bickmore was born 6 January 1862 in Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, was christened 12 February 1889 in Newport, Orange, California, and died 14 June 1936 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California. She married Siney Cunningtham. He was born about 1850 in Illinois. She married Joseph Dustin 30 July 1878 in Santa Ana, Los Angeles, California, son of Buchias Dustin and Aseneth (Herlbert) Hurlbut. He was born 15 December 1827 in Hartland-Leroy, Genesee, New York, and died 10 December 1914 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California. She married Samuel William Van Ripper 11 October 1923 in San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California, son of Peter Van Ripper and Anna Eliza Ratau. He was born 11 January 1840 in Holland, and died 12 December 1926 in Harlem Springs, San Bernardino, California.

v. Gilbert Montier Lafayette Bickmore was born 22 August 1864 in Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, and died 26 January 1950 in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo, California. He married Nettie B. M. Casteel 14 September 1896 in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo, California. She was born 7 June 1875 in Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California, and died 28 July 1963 in Camarillo, Ventura, California.

vi. James William (Willie) Bickmore was born about 1869/1870 in Gonzales, Monterey, California, and died 9 June 1881 in Huesna District, Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

MARY BURR (HOWES) 1603-1695

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, son of John Bickmore, son of Elizabeth Andrews (Bickmore), daughter of Joseph Andrews, son of Phebe Goard (Andrews), daughter of Phoebe Howes (Goard), daughter of Mary Burr (Howes).

Howes, Thomas and Mary

Prence-Howes Press Cupboard owned by Mary Howes


This massive chest, now in the permanent collection of The Dennis Historical Society, was owned by Thomas and Mary Howes and was used by them to hold all of their personal belongings and worldly possessions during and after their passage on ship from England to America. It dates to the mid-1630's (or perhaps even earlier) and is constructed of English Red Oak. (photo courtesy of The Dennis Historical Society)

Plymouth Court cupboard owned by Thomas and Mary Howes
"446. Plymouth Court Cupboard. 1660-70. Restored at B___ O___ Metropolitan Museum.
Probably same maker as proceeding. As to that we add:
Plymouth in 1660 had but sixty families and the lands were poor. Thomas Prence (spelled also Prince) was Governor wwhen, in 166__ he was called to come to Plymouth to live and continued there in a house, "Plais Dealing," supplied by the colony, till his death in 1623. In his will he evises this cupboard "in my new parleor" to his wife Mary (Howes). She departed for the Cape and the article was in an old house in Dennis.



Thom Prence's house

MIGRATION: 1621 on Fortune
FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth
REMOVES: Duxbury by 1637, Eastham 1644, Plymouth by 1665
FREEMAN: In the "1633" Plymouth list of freemen Thomas Prence was just after the councillors, and ahead of those admitted on 1 January 1632/3 [PCR 1:3]. "Thomas Prence, gen.," is in the 7 March 1636/7 list of Plymouth freemen [MBCR 1:52]. In the list of assistants at the head of the "1639" list of Plymouth Colony freemen, but as this list was revised and annotated his name was included in the "Nawsett" portion of the list [PCR 8:173, 177]. In Eastham section of 1658 list of Plymouth freemen, and in Plymouth section of list of 29 May 1670 [PCR 5:274, 8:201]
EDUCATION: His inventory included a long list of books valued at £14 2d., including two great Bibles and "100 of psalm books."
OFFICES: Plymouth Governor, 1634, 1638, 1657-72 [MA Civil List 35]. Assistant, Plymouth Colony, 1632-33, 1635-37, 1639-56 [PCR 1:32, 36, 48, 116, 140, 2:8, 15, 33, 40, 52, 56, 71, 83, 115; MA Civil List 37-38]. Treasurer, 1637 [PCR 1:48; MA Civil List 36]. Council of War, 1637 [PCR 1:60, PTR 1:16]. Commissioner for the United Colonies, 1645, 1650, 1653-58, 1661-63, 1670-72 [MA Civil List 28-29]. In Plymouth section of 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms [PCR 8:188]. ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth division of land Thomas Prence received one acre as a passenger on the Fortune [PCR 12:5]. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle Thomas Prince, Patience Prince and Rebecca Prince are the tenth, eleventh and twelfth persons in the fifth company [PCR 12:10]. In the Plymouth tax list of 25 March 1633 Thomas Prence was assessed £1 7s. [PCR 1:9]. He was omitted from the list of 27 March 1634. His cattle mark was three marks on the outer side of the ear [PTR 1:2]. Thomas Prence received grants of land, 1 July 1633, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7 meadow at Jones River; 6 March 1636/7 land between two cedar swamps at Island Creeke Pond; 5 February 1637/8 all the land between Greenes Harbor and South River; 2 April 1638 a garden place; 5 November 1638 ten acres of land "in some convenient place about the town"; 3 December 1638 an acre and a half at Smilt River; 2 December 1639 a parcel between John Barnes's garden and George Watson's field; 16 September 1641 an enlargement at the head of his Joanes River lot; 17 October 1642 an additional six acres at Joanes River; 2 October 1650 granted rights to bass fishing at Cape Cod [PCR 1:14, 40, 51, 56, 77, 83, 102, 103, 136, 142, 145, 163, 2:26, 49, 161]. He exchanged land with John Combe, Phinehas Pratt and John Barnes [PCR 1:25, 30, 12:197]. On 14 September 1638 Mr. Thomas Prence purchased two acres of land on the south side of the second brook from Ellinor Billington and Francis Billington [PCR 12:37]. On 29 May 1643 he contributed 6d. to buy drumheads and £14 to buy bread [PTR 1:14-15]. About 1645 Mr. Thomas Prence acknowledged that he had sold to Mr. Edmond Freeman all his house and garden place and barn in Plymouth, ten acres of upland in the woods and five acres in the second brook, and eleven acres by John Barnes's land and one farm at Joanes River [PCR 12:129-30]. On 11 July 1649 Mr. Thomas Prence of Nawset, gentleman, sold to Jacob Cooke of Plymouth, planter, forty acres of upland in Rocky Noocke with three acres of marsh [PCR 12:175]. On 13 July 1649 Mr. Thomas Prence of Nawset, gentleman, sold to Richard Church of Nawset, carpenter, and to Anthony Snow of Marshfield, feltmaker, upland and marsh at Marshfield and forty acres of upland received by grant dated 5 February 1647 [PCR 12:176]. On 13 June 1655 Thomas Prence of Eastham sold to "Mr. Edward Buckley" of Marshfield five acres of marsh in Marshfield [MD 9:234, citing PCLR 2:1:155]. On 12 July 1655 Thomas Prence of Eastham sold to John Browne of Rehoboth "my half share with other purchasers situate and being near Rehoboth and Sowamsett" [MD 10:16, citing PCLR 2:1:159]. On 31 August 1658 Thomas Prence sold to John Cooke of Plymouth two acres of marsh meadow at Jones River [MD 13:44, citing PCLR 2:2:6]. On 5 February 1665 the town of Plymouth granted Mr. Thomas Prence six acres of upland meadow on the west side of Jones River meadow and on 16 March 1667[/8] twelve acres more there [PTR 1:83, 97]. On 8 December 1662 Thomas Prence deeded to "my son [i.e., stepson] Samuell Freeman and Mercye his wife the house and land Samuel now dwelleth in" [PCLR 3:201]. On 20 September 1664 Thomas Prence deeded to John Freeman of Eastham "all that his upland and meadow lying on the southeast side of great Namskekett, viz: a parcel of upland containing eight acres ... with five acres of meadow"; also two acres of meadow with ten acres of upland [PCLR 3:28]. On 14 November 1669 Thomas Prence exchanged one hundred acres "of upland lying upon Pachague Neck on the southerly side of Teticutt River" with "Mrs. Alice Bradford the executrix of Mr. William Bradford," receiving in return "a half share of Purchase Land at Satuckett, be it forty-five acres more or less, and also the one-half of twenty-five acres of meadow" [PCLR 3:171]. On 2 May 1670 Thomas Prence of Plymouth, Gent., sold to Thomas Paine of Eastham, cooper, "all my one-half share of Purchase Land at Paomett," with the consent of "Mrs. Prence" [PCLR 5:480]. On 25 July 1672 Thomas Prence, Esquire, Governor of New Plymouth, deeded to John Freeman Sr. of Eastham "one parcel of land containing thirty acres"; "another parcel of land containing eight acres ... of swamp and upland"; "one other parcel of marshland, containing twenty-four acres"; "also forty acres of upland"; "also [another] forty acres of upland"; "also fifteen acres of upland"; and "also five acres of upland" [PCLR 3:278]. In his will, dated 13 March 1672/3 and proved 5 June 1673, "Thomas Prence being at present weak in body" bequeathed to "Mary my beloved wife ... such household goods of any kind as were hers before we married, returned to her again, after my decease, and if any of them be much impaired or be wanting, that she shall make it good out of my estate in such goods as she desireth"; to "my said loving wife my best bed and the furniture thereunto appertaining, and the court cupboard that now stands in the new parlor with the cloth and cushion that is on it, and an horse and three cows such as she shall make choice of, and four of my best silver spoons, and also during her natural life, I give her the rents and profits of my part of the mill at Satuckett, and of the lands adjoining, and my debts and legacies being first paid, I do further give unto my said wife a full third part of my personal estate that remains"; to "my daughter Jane the wife of Marke Snow my silver tankard"; to "my daughter Mary Tracye a silver wine cup and a dram cup"; to "my daughter Sarah Howes my biggest beer bowl"; to "my daughter Elizabeth Howland my silver salt"; to "my grandchild Theophilus Mayo and to the heirs of his body lawfully begotten, the one half of my lands and meadows at or near Namassakett in the township of Middleberry"; "I give unto my grandchild Sussanna Prence the daughter of my deceased son Thomas Prence, the other half of my above mentioned lands and meadows at Middleberry aforesaid"; in the absence of an heir of these grandchildren, the abovesaid lands to revert to "my daughters, or such of them as shall be then surviving, or their heirs if all my daughters should be dead"; "to my said grandchild Theophilus, and to his heirs forever, my part of the mill and lands adjacent at Satuckett after the decease of my wife, and this I give for his encouragement to proceed in learning"; residue divided between "my seven daughters, Hannah, Marcye, Jane, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah and Judith, and my above mentioned grandchild Susanna Prence"; Mary "my beloved wife sole executrix"; "my loving friend Major Josias Winslow to be helpful therein." A codicil to the will bequeathed "to Mr. John Freeman Speed's Cronicle and Wilson's Dictionary and the abridgement, and Simpson's History of the Church and Newman's Concordance"; to "my daughter Elizabeth Howland a black heifer"; a little yellow heifer to Lydia Sturtivant; to "my daughter Jane a bed, and another bed to my daughter Elizabeth Howland"; to "my grandson Theophilus Mayo all my books fit for him in learning, and if he carry it well to his grandmother I then give him a bed"; also "I desire my brother Thomas Clarke to be helpful to my wife as need may require" [MD 3:204-06, citing PCPR 3:1:58-59]. The inventory of "Thomas Prence Esqr. lately deceased" was taken 23 April 1673 and totalled £422 10s. 7d. [MD 3:206-16, citing PCPR 3:1:60-70]. Real estate was listed at the end of the inventory, but unvalued: "one hundred acres of land lying in the town of Middleberry at or near Winnapaukett pond and the brook going from it"; "one share of meadow lying in a certain tract of meadow called the Major's meadow that lieth upon Namassakett River, betwixt the pond and the weir"; "one hundred acres of land lying on the northerly side of Teticutt River"; "a considerable tract of land that lieth on the easterly side of Namassakett River between Winnapauckett pond and a tract of land called the Major's purchase"; "eight acres of land on the westerly side of Namassakett River"; "a grant of ten or twelve acres of land and a small parcel of meadow at Jones River meadow in the township of Plymouth"; "ten acres of land lying on the south side of a cart way that goeth to Lakenham, called Prence bottom in Plymouth"; "the one half of fifty or sixty acres of land and three acres of meadow between him and Major Winslow in Middleberry"; "twenty acres of land and three acres of meadow at Tonsett in the township of Eastham"; "eight acres of land lying on Pochey Island in the aforesaid Eastham"; and "one fourth part of a mill at Satuckett and lands adjoining to it" [MD 3:215-16]. On 10 June 1673 John Freeman, Jonathan Sparrow, John Tracy, Mark Snow, Jeremiah Howes, Arthur Howland and Isaac Barker receipted to "our mother-in-law Mrs. Mary Prence late wife and executrix to our father Thomas Prence Esquire deceased" for their shares of the estate of Thomas Prence [MD 33:97-100 (with photograph of the unrecorded original)]. On 10 June 1676 Josiah Winslow, Esquire, "attorney for ... Susanna Prence at Catheren Gate near the Tower in London ..., singlewoman"; and John Freeman in the right of Mary his wife and as attorney for "Mary Prence, relict and executrix of the last will and testament of the honored Thomas Prence, late Governor ... deceased," and of Jonathan Sparrow and Hannah his wife, Marke Snow and Jane his wife, and Jeremiah Howes and Sarah his wife, daughters of the said Thomas Prence; and John Tracye and Mary his wife, Arthur Howland and Elizabeth his wife, and Isacke Barker and Judith his wife, daughters also of the said Thomas Prence, sold to Constant Southworth, treasurer and agent of Plymouth Colony, "all that our dwelling house, messuage or tenement" in Plymouth "at a place commonly called Plain Dealing"; signed by Josiah Winslow, John Freeman, John Trasye, Arthur Howland and Isack Barker [PCLR 4:124].
BIRTH: About 1600 based on age at death, son of Thomas Prence, carriage-maker, of Lechdale, Gloucestershire. In his will, dated 31 July 1630 and proved 14 August 1630, Thomas Prence, carriage-maker, of Lechdale, Gloucestershire, left a legacy to his son Thomas Prence "now remaining in New England in the parts beyond the seas" [HREF="javascript:APop(p28986,100,120);">EIHC 7:103-04, citing PCC 70 Scroope].
DEATH: Plymouth 29 March 1673, in his 73rd year ("Thomas Prence, Esquire, Governor of the jurisdiction of New Plymouth, died the 29th of March, 1673, and was interred the 8th of April following. After he had served God in the office of Governor sixteen years, or near thereunto, he finished his course in the 73 year of his life. He was a worthy gentleman, very pious, and very able for his office, and faithful in the discharge thereof, studious of peace, a wellwiller to all that feared God, and a terror to the wicked. His death was much lamented, and his body honorably buried at Plymouth the day and year above mentioned" [PCR 8:34; see also MD 3:203-04]).
MARRIAGE: (1) Plymouth 5 August 1624 Patience Brewster [Prince 229], daughter of WILLIAM BREWSTER; she died late in 1634 (in a letter to his son John Winthrop Jr. dated 12 December 1634, JOHN WINTHROP reported that "the pestilent fever hath taken away some at Plimouth, among others Mr. Prence the governor his wife ..." [WP 3:177]). (2) Plymouth 1 April 1635 Mary Collier [PCR 1:34], daughter of WILLIAM COLLIER; she died perhaps by 1644. (3) After 1 July 1644 (when she witnessed Rev. George Phillips's will as Apphia Freeman in Watertown [NEHGR 3:78]) and certainly some considerable time before 8 December 1662 (when Thomas gave land to her son) Apphia (Quick) Freeman, former wife of SAMUEL FREEMAN, daughter of William Quick of London [TAG 11:178]. (4) After 26 February 1665[/6] and by 1 August 1668 Mary (_____) Howes, widow of Thomas Howes [MD 6:157-65, 230-35]. She died 9 December 1695 [MD 6:230, citing YarTR 3:328].
CHILDREN:

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

JOHN BILLS 1576-1630

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, son of John Bickmore, son of Elizabeth Andrews (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Bills (Bickmore), daughter of Samuel Bills, son of Thomas Bills, son of John Bills, son of John Bills.]


King James Bible 1611
From Authorized King James Version (wikepedia)
The original printing of the Authorized Version of the King James Bible was published by Robert Barker, the King's Printer, in 1611 as a complete folio Bible. It was sold loose leaf for ten shillings, or bound for twelve. Robert Barker's father, Christopher, had, in 1589, been granted by Elizabeth I the title of royal Printer, with the perpetual Royal Privilege to print Bibles in England. Robert Barker invested very large sums in printing the new edition, and consequently ran into serious debt, such that he was compelled to sub-lease the privilege to two rival London printers, Bonham Norton and John Bill. It appears that it was initially intended that each printer would print a portion of the text, share printed sheets with the others, and split the proceeds. Bitter financial disputes broke out, as Barker accused Norton and Bill of concealing their profits, while Norton and Bill accused Barker of selling sheets properly due to them as partial Bibles for ready money. There followed decades of continual litigation, and consequent imprisonment for debt for members of the Barker and Norton printing dynasties, while each issued rival editions of the whole Bible. In 1629 the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge successfully managed to assert separate and prior royal licences for Bible printing, for their own university presses – and Cambridge University took the opportunity to print revised editions of the Authorized Version in 1629,] and 1638. The editors of these editions included John Bois and John Ward from the original translators. This did not, however, impede the commercial rivalries of the London printers, especially as the Barker family refused to allow any other printers access to the authoritative manuscript of the Authorized Version.
found on ancestry.com


John Bill
John Bill was a publisher from 1607-1639 and was publisher to King James I of England in 1613. He is buried at St. Anne's Blackfriars London
found on ancestry.com


John Bill 1576 Publisher
John Bill was born 1576 at Much Wenlock, Shropshire, England and died after 1639, probably at London, England. He was buried at St. Anne's, Blackfriars, London, England. He followed the occupation of Publisher 1607-1639 and was Publisher to King James I of England in 1613.
found on ancestry.com


King's Printer Project
In the Jacobean period the King’s Printers were Robert Barker (1570–1645), and the two Shropshire men, Bonham Norton (1564–1635) and John Bill (1576–1630). At this time the office of the King’s Printer included the privilege to print the Bible and the Book of Common Prayer in English. John Norton (1556/7–1612), Bonham’s cousin held a quite different patent, to the office of King’s Printer in Latin, Greek and Hebrew from 1603 until his death in 1612, when his rights to the office passed to Bonham Norton. But the rights to the office of King’s Printer in English were in dispute, and Robert Barker, Bonham Norton and John Bill—who held the office either alone, or together in various partnerships from 1603–1645—fought bitter legal battles in the Court of Chancery for more than a decade to establish their rights to a share in the business.1

Robert Barker held the office of Queen’s/King’s Printer in English from 1593, through a reversionary patent first assigned by Queen Elizabeth to his father Christopher Barker senior.2 Even though Robert Barker had manor houses and landed interests with valuable rents to support his family he was greatly in debt, partly due to costs incurred through the printing of the Authorized Version of the Bible in 1611.3 In 1615 he assigned houses and lands to Bonham Norton and John Bill as security in lieu of debts.4 These debts became entangled with the KPH when, in 1615, for the sum of £5000 Robert Barker entered into a three-way KPH partnership with Bonham Norton and John Bill on behalf of his son, Christopher Barker. This three-way KPH partnership followed Christopher’s marriage to Bonham Norton’s daughter, Sara, in 1615, and ran until 1617 when Robert Barker assigned his present and future interests in the KPH to Bonham Norton and John Bill alone for the sum of £6,500.5 Under Barker’s management the KPH lacked investment and had no stock of books belonging to the office, but Bonham Norton and John Bill invested heavily in the office, and as Bonham Norton was, from 1613, King’s Printer in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, the two offices became entangled politically and financially. Furthermore, through John Bill’s good managing of the business (which drew in overseas investments through his Continental contacts) the office began to pay. These Continental contacts emerged from a joint-stock partnership which Bonham Norton, John Norton, and John Bill had set up in 1603. This long-running partnership, from 1603-1619 was designed to import continental books and stationary, and to produce books at home and abroad. 6 It operated through an intricate web of book-trade contacts and markets, which John Bill was able to draw into the operation of the KPH. The KPH institutions extended their power as instruments of cultural production in Jacobean England. James’s desire to define a national culture and influence European thought through the printed word meant that the Salopians’ book-trading became as important culturally for the king as it was financially for the partners.7
In May 1618, conscious of the profits to be made by the KPH, Robert Barker wanted the business back, or financial compensation, claiming he had only assigned the office to Norton and Bill on trust for money they had loaned him. There followed a Chancery Petition from Robert Barker against Norton and Bill8 , for the reassignment of the patents, assets and profits of the KPH which led to cross-petitions from Norton, and the involvement of successive Lord Chancellors and even the king, James I. In May 1619 Barker obtained a Chancery decree in his favour from the Lord Chancellor Francis Bacon.9 Bacon ordered Bonham Norton to reassign his share of the KPH to Robert Barker while Barker was ordered to repay to Norton what he owed. John Bill was found to be a bona fide purchaser of the KPH, a finding which may have been ‘grounded vpon a reference from the Kings Matie’ to the Lord Archbishop.10 Bill also presented Chancery petitions against Norton in a bid to defer paying Norton money he owed, while defending his position as King’s Printer. 11 Bill continued to enjoy the protection of James I and managed to hang on to his share of the office, partly due to ‘extra iudiciall’ references from the king until his death in 1630, when his share passed to his son John Bill junior. 12 But Robert Barker was still short of money in 1619 and was unable to fulfil the conditions as laid down by Francis Bacon’s 1619 decree in Chancery, and so he and Norton came to various short-lived accommodations and agreements over the rights to the KPH. The case consequently rumbled on, through a series of Chancery petitions and cross petitions 13, until 1629/30 when Chancery, once again, eventually found against Norton and in favour of Robert Barker—despite the fact that Barker had bribed Bacon to make the decree of 1619 in his favour, and may possibly have bribed Lord Keeper Thomas Coventry to do the same in his 1629 ruling. 14

Norton was fined heavily by the court and remained in prison, possibly until his death in 1635.15 Robert Barker continued as King’s Printer even after being committed to prison for debt in 1635, where he remained until his death in 1645.
found on ancestry.com


The King James Bible
Robert Barker was the King's Printer and, thus, when the new King James Bible was to be printed, the work fell to him. Realizing what a large financial undertaking this was, he took as his partners Bonham Norton, John Norton and John Bill. Within five years of the new Bible being published, the partners had a falling out. The above information is from "In the Beginning: The Story of the King James Bible And How it Changed a Nation, A Language, and A Culture" by Alister McGrath, published by Anchor Books, New York.
found on ancestry.com

MARY HOWARTH (PICCUP) 1666-

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Ellen Oldham (Bickmore), daughter of John Oldham, son of William Oldham, son of Alice Duckworth (Oldham), daughter of Susannah Picop (Duckworth), daughter of James Piccop, son of Mary Howarth (Piccop).]

letter from Mary's brother George to their mother
Loving Mother
My dear love to thee hopeing these lines may find thee in good health as I am at present, the Allmighty be praised for it and hath been mostly since I left you but last Winter I had the Fever and ague 5 months, I received your tokens which was half a crown from thee, and a shilling from my loving Brother, which I received very gladly, but I should have been more glad to have received a letter with it, I do much admire that I never received no Letter from you since I came here it makes me think you have all most forgotten me; I am very sorry and sore troubled that you so neglect writing to me, I desire you to write to me by the next opportunity and not to fail. Remem?ber my love to my loving Sister Sarah and to Brother James and to my sister Susannah and all my Relations and to Friends and neighbours. Two Months ago I was with my Sister Mary where she doth dwell, and she was in good health and her Husband and their children, They have had six children but the youngest is dead, John, Mary, Sarah, James, and Elizabeth, but George died of the Small pox. they live about 172 miles from me near Maryland upon the Sea coast and I live up the country near Delaware river 20 miles above Philadelphia. And as for the Country affairs I have writ in my former Letters, only Corn is cheap, but I could gladly wish as many of you as desire to come here were well settled here. And if any of you come here or any of your acquaintance come, come free, it is a great deal better living here than in England for working people, poor working people doth live as well as here, as landed men doth live with you thats worth 20L a year, I live a single life and hath builded a Shop, and doth follow weaving of linnen cloth, but I have bought 450 acres of land in the Woods, but doth not live on it yet, so no more at present, but I rest with my love to thee, desiring thy health both in this world and thy Souls health in the World to come my own hand writing.
From thy loving son
George Haworth.
(Hand written here is a note ) The above Letter appears in: Jas. R. Haworth; "George Haworth and Some of his Descendants"
found on ancestry.com

WILLIAM CARY 1550-1632

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, son of John Bickmore, son of Elizabeth Andrews (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Bills (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Webstead (Bills), daughter of Mehitable Cary (Webstead), daughter of James Cary, son of William Cary.]

Interesting Fact 14 William Cary born 1550 in England, Bristol died March 01, 1631/32 in Bristol, England. 
+Elizabeth Alice Goodale died 1623 in Bristol, England
William Cary 1550-1663, the Elder, Draper. Was Mayor of Bristol in 1611. Married Alice Goodall. 
3 October 1550, baptized at Bristol England as recorded at St. Nicholas Parrish.
From: http://www.careyroots.com/careyenglish.html
found on ancestry.com


Carey Family 1500's, Began in Bristol, England
Cary Family
Generation One 1. William Cary; born circa 1492; died at Bristol, England; buried 28 March 1572 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England. He was Sheriff of Bristol, England. He resided at Bristol, England. Known children of William Cary include:
i. William Cary; born at Bristol, England; married Elizabeth; died between March 1572 and 1573. He was a cloth worker. He resided at London, England.
ii. Agnes Cary; married Humphrey Cooper 1544; married Thomas Dickinson after 1569.
iii. Susan Cary; married John Lacy after 1571. 2.
iv. Richard Cary, born circa 1515 at Bristol, England; married Anne; married Joan Holton.

Generation Two 2. Richard Cary (William1); born circa 1515 at Bristol, England; married Anne; married Joan Holton circa 1561; died at Bristol, England; buried 17 June 1570 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England. He was a merchant. Anne died after 1561.
Known children of Richard Cary and Anne were as follows:
i. Richard Cary; baptized 18 August 1542 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; buried 14 June 1591 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England.
ii. Lettice Cary; born 1543 at Bristol, England; married ___ Mellen; died after 1570.
iii. Mary Cary; born 1544; died infancy.
iv. Mary Cary; born 1546 at Bristol, England; died after 1570.
v. Elizabeth Cary; born 1548 at Bristol, England; died infancy.
vi. Frances Cary; born 1549 at Bristol, England; died after 1570. 3.
vii. William Cary, baptized 3 October 1550 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; married Elizabeth Goodale; married Mary Llewellyn.
viii. Elizabeth Cary; born 1551 at Bristol, England; died after 1570.
ix. Agnes Cary; born circa 1555 at Bristol, England; died after 1570.
x. Martha Cary; born 1558 at Bristol, England; died infancy.
Joan Holton was the sister of Robert Holton, Chamberlain of Bristol.
Known children of Richard Cary and Joan Holton all born at Bristol, England, were as follows:
i. Martha Cary; born 1562; died after 1570.
ii. Anne Cary; born circa 1564.
iii. Christopher Cary; born circa 1568; married Lettice Young; died 1626 at Bristol, England. He was Sheriff at Bristol, England. He was a merchant.

Generation Three 3. William Cary (Richard2, William1); baptized 3 October 1550 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; married Elizabeth Goodale 14 January 1572; married Mary Llewellyn, daughter of George Llewellyn, 1624; buried 1 March 1632/33 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England. He was Mayor of Bristol. He resided at Bristol, Somersetshire, England. Elizabeth Goodale died in 1623.
Known children of William Cary and Elizabeth Goodale were as follows:
i. William Cary; baptized 3 January 1576 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; buried 1638.
ii. Richard Cary; baptized 1 August 1579 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; married Mary Shershaw, daughter of Nicholas Shershaw, 1606; died 1644. 4.
iii. John Cary, born 10 April 1583 at Bristol, England; married Elizabeth Hereford; married Alice Hobson.
iv. Walter Cary; baptized 18 June 1588 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; married Grace Browne; died 1633/34.
v. Robert Cary; baptized 3 November 1589 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; married Anne Thomas, daughter of William Thomas; died 1628. He was a draper.
vi. Anne Cary; born 1590 at Bristol, England; died after 1632.
vii. Susan Cary; born circa 1592 at Bristol, England; died after 1632.
viii. Margery Cary; married Hugh Yeo.
ix. Thomas Cary; baptized 11 April 1596 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; married Joan Milner; died 1648.
x. James Cary; baptized 14 April 1600 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; died 2 November 1681 at Charlestown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Mary Llewellyn resided at Keynsham, England.
Known children of William Cary and Mary Llewellyn were as follows:
i. Anne Cary; born 1624; died infancy.
ii. Henry Cary; baptized 20 November 1625 at St. Nicholas Church, Bristol, England; died after 1700. He resided at Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.

Generation Four 4. John Cary (William3, Richard2, William1); born 10 April 1583 at Bristol, England; married Elizabeth Hereford 29 May 1609; married Alice Hobson, daughter of Henry Hobson and Alice Dans, circa 1617/18; died 1661/62. He was Mayor at Bristol, England. He resided at Bristol, England. He was a draper.
Known children of John Cary and Elizabeth Hereford were as follows:
i. John Cary; born circa 1610; died circa 1656.
ii. Thomas Cary; baptized 27 December 1613; married Susanna Limberry, daughter of Philip Limberry.
iii. Philip Cary.
iv. Prudence Cary.
v. Elizabeth Cary.
Known children of John Cary and Alice Hobson were as follows:
i. Henry Cary; born circa 1618; died after 1634.
ii. Matthew Cary; born circa 1620; died 1648. He was a mariner. He resided at Stepney, Middlesex, England.
iii. Richard Cary; baptized 29 July 1621 at All Saint's Church, Bristol, England; died after 1660. 5.
iv. Col. Miles Cary, baptized 30 January 1622/23 at All Saint's Church, Bristol, England; married Anne Taylor.
v. Alice Cary; born circa 1625; married Thomas Hayman; married William Payne.
vi. Honor Cary; born circa 1627; buried 6 November 1644 at All Saint's Church, Bristol, England. 6.
vii. Mary Cary, married Hon. Nathaniel Harrison.

Generation Five 5. Col. Miles Cary (John4, William3, Richard2, William1); baptized 30 January 1622/23 at All Saint's Church, Bristol, England; married Anne Taylor, daughter of Capt. Thomas Taylor, circa 1646; died 10 June 1667 at Warwick County, Virginia, at age 44; of wounds received in the attack of the Dutch fleet on Old Point Comfort. He immigrated circa 1645 to 'Windmill Point', Warwick County, Virginia. He and Anne Taylor resided at 'Windmill Point', Warwick County, Virginia. He and Anne Taylor resided at 'Magpie Swamp', Warwick County, Virginia. He was a member of Council from 1663 to 1667 at Virginia. He left a will on 9 June 1667; proved 21 January 1667/8. Anne Taylor died after 1682.
Known children of Col. Miles Cary and Anne Taylor were as follows:
i. Maj. Thomas Cary; born circa 1647; married Anne Milner, daughter of Capt. Francis Milner, by 1669. He resided at 'Windmill Point', Warwick County, Virginia. He resided at 'Magpie Swamp', Warwick County, Virginia. He left a will; proved 1608.
ii. Anne Cary; born circa 1649; died unmarried. 7.
iii. Henry Cary, born circa 1650; married Judith Lockey. 8.
iv. Bridget Cary, born 1651; married Capt. William Bassett. 9.
v. Elizabeth Cary, born circa 1653; married Emanuel Wills. 10.
vi. Col. Miles Cary, born 1655; married Mary Milner; married Mary Wilson. 11.
vii. Lt. Col. William Cary, born circa 1657; married Martha Scasbrook.

6. Mary Cary (John4, William3, Richard2, William1); married Hon. Nathaniel Harrison, son of Hon. Benjamin Harrison and Hannah Churchill. She and Hon. Nathaniel Harrison resided at 'Wakefield', Surry County, Virginia. Hon. Nathaniel Harrison was born on 8 August 1677. He died on 30 November 1727 at age 50. He was a member of Council at Virginia.
Known children of Mary Cary and Hon. Nathaniel Harrison include: 12.
i. Hannah Harrison, married Armistead Churchill.

Generation Six 7. Henry Cary (Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born circa 1650; married Judith Lockey, daughter of Edward Lockey Jr, by 24 May 1671; 1st wife. He resided at 'The Forest', Warwick County, Virginia. He was a builder, buildings include the Capitol at Williamsburg and the Governor's Palace. He left a will on 27 January 1716 at Warwick County, Virginia; proved 1 September 1720.
Known children of Henry Cary and Judith Lockey include:
i. Elizabeth Cary; born circa 1678; married Capt. John Scasbrook II, son of Lt. Col. John Scasbrook and Elizabeth, circa 1698.

8. Bridget Cary (Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1651; married Capt. William Bassett, son of William Bassett and Anne, 1670. Capt. William Bassett immigrated before 1665 to Virginia. He resided at Blisland Parish, New Kent County, Virginia. He left a will on 28 August 1671; proved 4 January 1671/2. He died in 1671.
Known children of Bridget Cary and Capt. William Bassett include: 13.
i. Hon. William Bassett, born 1671; married Joanna Burwell.

9. Elizabeth Cary (Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born circa 1653; married Emanuel Wills before 11 April 1670. Emanuel Wills died by 21 Aug 1697. He resided at Warwick County, Virginia.
Known children of Elizabeth Cary and Emanuel Wills include:
i. Miles Wills; married Hannah Scasbrook, daughter of Lt. Col. John Scasbrook and Elizabeth, after 2 April 1694. He resided at Warwick County, Virginia

10. Col. Miles Cary (Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1655; married Mary Milner, daughter of Lt. Col. Thomas Milner, circa 1683; 1st wife; married Mary Wilson, daughter of Col. William Wilson and Jane, April 1702; 2nd wife, 2nd husband; died 16 February 1708/9. He resided at 'Rich Neck', Warwick County, Virginia. He was a member of the House of Burgesses. He was Surveyor General of Virginia from 1699 to 1709. Mary Milner was born on 6 August 1667. She died on 27 October 1700 at age 33. Mary Wilson was born in October 1675. She married William Roscow in 1695; 1st husband. She married Archibald Blair; 3rd husband. She died on 11 January 1741 at age 65. She was buried at Blunt Point, Warwick County, Virginia.
Known children of Col. Miles Cary and Mary Wilson were as follows: 14.
i. Col. Wilson Cary, born 1702; married Sarah Pate.
ii. Mary Cary; born 1704; married Joseph Selden. She left a will at Elizabeth City County, Virginia; proved 25 March 1775.
iii. Anne Cary; born 1706; married Maj. Peter Whiting, son of Col. Henry Whiting and Anne Beverley; died before 1749.
iv. Miles Cary; born 1708. He resided at 'Ceeleys', Elizabeth City County, Virginia. He left a will on 11 October 1752 at Elizabeth City County, Virginia; proved 8 September 1756.

11. Lt. Col. William Cary (Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born circa 1657; married Martha Scasbrook, daughter of Lt. Col. John Scasbrook and Elizabeth, by 24 March 1684/5; died 1713. He resided at 'Skiffs Creek', Warwick County, Virginia. He was a member of the House of Burgesses. He left a will on 26 August 1711; proved 4 June 1713.
Known children of Lt. Col. William Cary and Martha Scasbrook were as follows:
i. Harwood Cary; born 1685; married Martha before 1707; 2nd husband; died 1721. He resided at 'Skiffs Creek', Warwick County, Virginia. 15.
 ii. Martha Cary, born 1686; married Edward Jaquelin.
iii. Maj. Miles Cary; born circa 1698; died after 1711.
iv. William Cary; born 1700; married Judith Jones circa 1724. He resided at Prince George County, Virginia. He left a will on 3 April 1742 at Prince George County, Virginia; proved 14 September 1742.
v. John Cary; born circa 1701; died after 1711; d.s.p.

12. Hannah Harrison (Mary5Cary, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); married Armistead Churchill, son of Col. William Churchill and Elizabeth Armistead. Armistead Churchill was born on 25 July 1704 at 'Rosegill', Middlesex County, Virginia. He resided at 'Bushby Park', Middlesex County, Virginia. He left a will on 21 August 1758; proved August 1763.
Known children of Hannah Harrison and Armistead Churchill include:
i. William Churchill; born 24 February 1726; married Elizabeth Carter, daughter of Col. Charles Carter and Mary Walker, 1751. He resided at 'Wilton', Middlesex County, Virginia. He resided at 'Bushy Park', Middlesex County, Virginia.

Generation Seven 13. Hon. William Bassett (Bridget6Cary, Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1671; married Joanna Burwell, daughter of Hon. Lewis Burwell and Abigail Smith, 28 November 1693; died 11 October 1723. He resided at 'Eltham', New Kent County, Virginia. He was a member of the House of Burgesses from 1693 to 1702 at Virginia. He was a member of Council from 1702 to 1723 at Virginia. Joanna Burwell was born in 1674/75. She resided at 'Carter's Creek', Gloucester County, Virginia. She died on 7 October 1727.
Known children of Hon. William Bassett and Joanna Burwell include:
i. Martha Bassett; born 28 December 1694; married Col. Gawin Corbin, son of Hon. Henry Corbin and Alice Eltonhead; 3rd wife. 16.
ii. Col. William Bassett, born 8 July 1709; married Elizabeth Churchill.

14. Col. Wilson Cary (Miles6, Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1702; married Sarah, probably Pate, daughter of John Pate, by 20 January 1728/29; died 28 November 1772 at 'Ceeleys', Elizabeth City County, Virginia. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, England. He was an attorney. He and Sarah Pate resided at 'Ceeleys', Elizabeth City County, Virginia. He and Sarah Pate resided at 'Rich Neck', Warwick County, Virginia. He left a will on 10 October 1772 at Elizabeth City County, Virginia; proved 25 February 1778. Sarah Pate was born circa 1710. She died in September 1783.
Known children of Col. Wilson Cary and Sarah Pate were as follows: 17.
 i. Mary Cary, born 1733; married Edward Ambler. 18.
ii. Ann Cary, born 1735; married Robert Carter Nicholas.

15. Martha Cary (William6, Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1686; married Edward Jaquelin, son of John Jaquelin and Elizabeth Craddock, 1706; 2nd wife; died 1738. Edward Jaquelin was born in 1668 at Kent, England. He married Rachel; 1st wife, 2nd husband. He resided at Jamestown Island, Virginia. He immigrated in 1697 to Virginia. He was a member of the House of Burgesses from 1712 to 1714 at Virginia. He died on 9 November 1739. Generation Eight

16. Col. William Bassett (William7, Bridget6Cary, Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 8 July 1709; married Elizabeth Churchill, daughter of Col. William Churchill and Elizabeth Armistead, 29 January 1729; 1st husband; died 1744?. He resided at 'Eltham', New Kent County, Virginia. He was a member of the House of Burgesses between 1743 and 1744 at Virginia. Elizabeth Churchill was born circa 1709. She resided at 'Eltham', New Kent County, Virginia. She died on 16 April 1779 at 'Eltham', New Kent County, Virginia.
Known children of Col. William Bassett and Elizabeth Churchill include:
i. Elizabeth Bassett; born 13 December 1730; married Gov. Benjamin Harrison V, son of Col. Benjamin Harrison IV and Anne Carter. She resided at New Kent County, Virginia.

17. Mary Cary (Wilson7, Miles6, Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1733; married Edward Ambler, son of Richard Ambler and Elizabeth Jaquelin, 1754; died 1781. Edward Ambler was born in 1733. He resided at Jamestown, Virginia. He died on 30 October 1767 or 30 October 1768.

18. Ann Cary (Wilson7, Miles6, Miles5, John4, William3, Richard2, William1); born 1735; married Robert Carter Nicholas, son of Dr. George Nicholas and Elizabeth Carter, 1751; died 1786. She resided at 'Ceeleys', Elizabeth City County, Virginia. Robert Carter Nicholas was born "1-28-1728" at Hanover County, Virginia. He was graduated at William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia. He was a judge. He was Treasurer of the Colony at Virginia. He died on 8 September 1780 at Virginia. Go to Elizabeth Starr Marshall Go to Jaquelin Ambler Marshall III Go to Martha Cary Go to Ann Cary Go to Miles Cary Go to Miles Cary Go to Marshall Genealogy Family Index Go to Marshall Genealogy Bibliography Go to Marshall Genealogy Page
found on ancestry.com


William Cary Notes William Cary 1550-1663, the Elder, Draper. Was Mayor of Bristol in 1611. Married Alice Goodall. 3 October 1550, baptized at Bristol England as recorded at St. Nicholas Parrish.
http://www.sparksgenealogy.net/cary.html
found on ancestry.com

JAMES CARY 1600-1681

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, son of John Bickmore, son of Elizabeth Andrews (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Bills (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Webstead (Bills), daughter of Mehitable Cary (Webstead), daughter of James Cary.]


NOTES James Cary was admitted to the church May 3, 1647. He was a draper and merchant, Clerk of the Writs in 1650.
Information taken from: Genealogical and Personal Memoirs relating to the families of the State of Massachusetts.
found on ancestry.com

WILLIAM SARGENT 1602-1682

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow), daughter of Isaac Danford Bickmore, son of Isaac Motor Bickmore, son of David Bickmore, son of John Bickmore, son of Elizabeth Andrews (Bickmore), daughter of Elizabeth Bills (Bickmore), daughter of Samuel Bill, son of Elizabeth Sargent (Bill), daughter of William Sargent.]


Rev. William Sargeant's signature







First Settlers of Amesbury


Golgotha Burying Ground, Amesbury, Massachusetts
It is a Memorial to the First Settlers Amesbury-1654 Golgotha is their first burying ground. http://gravematter.smugmug.com/gallery/848843#38151999 Location: Amesbury, Massachusetts


1640 Map of Mystic Side of Charlestown (Malden) Massachusetts

1640 Map of Mystic Side of Charlestown (Malden) Massachusetts Source: Title Sargent genealogy: Hugh Sargent, of Courteenhall, Northamptonshire and his descendants in England Authors Aaron Sargent, John S. Sargent Publisher A. Sargent, 1895 Original from the University of Wisconsin - Madison Digitized November 6, 2007 Length 218 pages Google Books

Rendering of the House at Mystic Side
1602-1682, Malden (Mystic Side of Charlestown), Massachusetts

The picture presented is of the house built by William Sargent, and bequeathed by him in his will to his son John. If it is not an exact representation, it has the merit of being as near, and probably nearer, to the original, than some of the modern statues and portraits of distinguished men of former times. The right-hand or east part of the picture, including the door and chimney, was standing until about the year 1890; and the picture is from a photographic copy. The architecture of the left-hand or west part is a matter of conjecture. But there certainly was a west part (and it would as certainly have conformed to the east part) ; for in the Middlesex Registry of Deeds there is a record of an indenture dated March I, 1713, between John Sargent and his sons Jonathan and Ebenezer, in which it is stated that the father " ffor and in consideraton of the naturall and ffatherly good will and affection which he hath and bequath unto his sons, ye said Jonathan and Ebenezar, part of his Dwelling house," "That is to say, The Lower Room in the west end of his Dwelling house with all the Garritt in the west end, with the Barn and all the out houseing and all the Land adjoining thereunto That was his ffather William Sargeants." In his will he gives his wife " the use and benefit of y° East End of my dwelling house from bottom to top," and to his unmarried daughters *' my west chamber," " and a free passage to it." He bequeaths to his sons Jonathan and Ebenezer all his lands not otherwise disposed of, and recites that he has already given them by deed of gift " an Estate in houseing and land." Source: Sargent genealogy: Hugh Sargent, of Courteenhall, Northamptonshire and his descendants in England Authors Aaron Sargent, John S. Sargent Publisher A. Sargent, 1895 Original from the University of Wisconsin - Madison Digitized November 6, 2007 Google Books

COURTEEN HALL

Who Begot Thee?
Book: Who Begot Thee? (found on Googlebooks)
"William Sargent. 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, who was son of Hugh, the Mayor of Northhampton, England, in 1626. Hugh Sargent married Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Gifford of the ancient and distinguish family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in September 1632. Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, co of Salop, gentleman and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire*. William Sargent came to America from Northhampton, England in 1638 with his newly married wife Sarah and two daughters by his first wife. He settled in Charlestown, in that part which afterwards became the town of Malden, where he was a lay preacher in 1648-50. He was also a Deacon and active citizen. He removed to Barnstable December 16, 1682. His widow died January 12, 1689.

HANNAH SARGENT. 1629-1717. Daughter of William. Born in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 to Henry Felch. Died December 15, 1717. Her sister Ruth, married (1) Jonathan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, who's first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came over in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth Chipman died in Sandwich in 1713. In her will she left her bequests to "the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading."
Pages 23-24
FOUND ON ANCESTRY.COM


William Sargeant He was on the freeman list of Northampton, England on July 20, 1626. He was senior Bailiff there 1632-1633. He was a deacon and lay preacher at Malden, Massachusetts. He married first Hannah about 1627. She was born about 1603 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, and died in of Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. He married (2) Mary about 1634. She was born about 1614 Northampton, Northamptonshire, England, and died in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England.

"In the Note Book published in 1885 of Thomas Lechford, lawyer, who was in Boston from 1637 to 1640, the following may be read:
John Winthrop Esqr. Governor of the Jurisdiction of the Massachusetts bay in New England to all manner of persons whome it may concern These are to certify you that William Sergeant late of North- hampton haberdasher of Hatts and now of Charletown in New England planter and Sarah his wife late the wife of William Minshall of Whitechurch in the County of Salop gent. Deceased are both blessed be God in full life and good health at the time of this making hereof. In testimony whereof I have caused the publicke seale of our Colony to be hereto affixed the fourteeneth day of November in the fifteenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of England & c Annoq Dni 1639."

William's farm was in the "southerly part of Mystic Side or Malden, on the southerly slope of a hill, about one and a third miles north-east from the river. The farm was owned by him as early as 1640 with the exception of eight acres southwest of and adjoining the original farm, which he purchased in 1654." He moved to Barnstable probably about 1656. He was made a freeman of Plymouth Colony in 1657. He was a minister in Barnstable and is said to have succeeded the Rev. John Lothrop. He had rented out his farm in Malden.

He will was probated in Plymouth Colony in Plymouth, Massachusetts. It reads:
"The last Will and Testament of Mr. William Serjant of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth, exhibited in the Court held att Plymouth aforsaid on the oathes of Mr. Thomas Hinckley assistant and John Chipman as followeth;

"I William Sargeant
Of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth being weak of body but by the Mercye of God of disposing mind and memory; and calling in mind the uncertainly of this Transitory life, and not knowing how soone it may please God to call mee hence, do therefore make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament, heerby, revoaking and adnulling all former and other will or wills heretofore by mee made eithr in word or writing; and this only to be accumpted and accepted as my Last Will and Testament as followeth.
Imp, I will and bequeath my soule to God in Jesus Christ my Deare Savior and onely redeemer and my body to decent buriall; and as to my Temporall estate which God hath bin pleased far above my deserts, to bestow upon mee, my will is that first of all thatt all my just debts which I owe to any p'son ir right or consience shall be first discharged and satisfyed out of my estate by my executors heerafter named, within convenient time after my decease.

Item-I will and bequeath to Sarah my loveing wife all my household stuffe and two of my Cowes to be wholy att her dispose, and the use of the new end of my now dwelling house, and the use of the new end of my now dwelling house, or the use of one such Room of my house att Maulden, at shee shall chuse in case shee there desire to live during her natural life, and for the further support and stay of liveing I will unto her eight pounds pr annum in current Country pay, to be payed out of the proffits of my lands by my two sons, John and Samuele, during her natural life, vid, my son John to pay six pounds therof and my son Samuel forty shillings therof yeerly, and every yeer during her natural life.

Item-I will and bequeath unto my son, John Sergeant, my house with all my lands att Maulden. To hom and her heirs forever so as hee may said son her heires or assigns, doe wll and truely pay or cause to be payed unto Sarah his mother the sume of six pounds pr annum as above mensioned, and after his said mothers decease, the sum of five pounds as a leganse which I will be payed to my Daughter Hannah Feech within one full yeer after her mothers my said wife her decease; and five pounds as a legacse I give and bequeath to my Daughter Ruth Bourne within two years after my said wifes decease and five pounds more to my said wifes decease. These Legacses to be payed in currant countrye pay at price currant; as they shall grow due and payable;

Item-I will and bequeath unto my son Samuell Sergeant my now Dwelling house with all my land in Barnstable to him and his heirs forever, so as hee the said Samuell his heires or assigns doe well and truely pay or cause to be payed unto the Said Sarah, his mother forty shillings pr annum in Currant Country pay during her natural life, as aforesaid, also I will and bequeath to him the said Samuell my two oxen 2 cowes and a horse with my cart plow and other Tackling thereunto belonging, Item I will to Samuell Bill, my grandson, one heiffer or young horse, and my will it to be leave all the rest of my estate in whatsoever it is unto my executors for the payment of my debts, and discharge of my funerall expences, and I doe hereby appoint and declare Saram my said loveing wife and my Son John Sergeant aforesaid to be my executors of this my Last Will and Testament; and my loveing friends Elder John Chipman and Deacon William Crocker to be ouerseers to see this my last Will and Testament to p'formed according to the true intent therof; in witness wherof I have heerunton sett my hand and seal this ninth day of Mach Ann Dom 1769-80."

The inventory was sworn on March 3, 1692-3.
found on ancestry.com


William Sargeant It is important to point out that I have used the original language and spelling on the records that I have typed into this family history for William Sargeant.

Information from:
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, p. 46.
Birth, Marriage and Death records on this family are from, "Birth, Marriage and Death Records, Malden, Masschusetts, 1649-1850
"Sargent Family Histories by Elbert Thomas and Aaron Sargent.
New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Apr 1848, pg. 197,Charlestown Vital Records To 1850
The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, 2 Vols.....Wyman
THE WILL OF WILLIAM SARGEANT: (WILL AND INVENTORY...DOC #157)
(From the Plymouth Colony Records, at Plymouth, Book of Wills, Vol. 4th, Part 2d, p. 19.)
The book, "Who Begot Thee" by Gilbert Oliver Bent, 1903, pgs. 23-24.Sargent, Aaron,. Genealogy of the Sarge(a)nt family : descendents of William, of Malden, Mass.. Boston: S.G. Drake, 1858.Colonel Clergy of New England, by F.L. Weiss, 182
For additional information on William Sargeant, see ancestors, Hugh and Roger Sargeant.

In 1639, the year after William arrived in the American Colonies (Massachusetts), the first printing office was set up in America at Cambridge by Stephen Daye of Seabrook Connecticut.

In 1682, when William died, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was founded by William Penn.

William was baptized on June 20, 1602 at All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England.

PROFESSION - HAT MERCHANT (HABERDASHER OF HATS/HAT MAKER) AND YEOMAN

Some researchers show that William and Sarah had a son, William, but this has not been proven.
20 Jul 1626 - Northampton, Northamptonshire, England - Made a Freeman (called "Son of Roger Sargeant").
1632-1633 " " " Senior Bailiff
22 Jan 1636/37 - All Saints Church, Northampton, England - William Sargeant's name appears for the last time in the register of All Saints Church at the Baptism of daughter, Mary from his first Marriage.

Some sources show that William had two children born in England, Elizabeth and Hannah. These children must have been from either his first or second marriage.
1638 - Came to American Colonies, to Charlestown, then settled in Malden, (Mystic Side), Massachusetts. (across the Mystic River.) William's property was in what is NOW Everett, Masschussets.
10 Mar 1639 - William Sargeant was admitted to the church in Charlestown, Masschusetts. His wife Sarah was admitted the following Sunday. William's migration from this established life and subsequent occupation as Lay Preacher seems to indicate that he became a rather staunch Puritan.
May 2, 1639 - Made a Freeman in Charlestown, Masschusetts.
The following entry is found in Lechford's "Note Book", pg. 224 or the printed edition (Cambridge, 1885):"John Winthrop, Esqr. Governor of the Jurrisdiccon of the Massachusetts bay in New England to all manner of persons whome it may concerne greeting.....These are to certify you that William Sergeant late of Northampton, haber-dasher of Hatts and now of Charlestown in New England planter and Sarah his wife, late the wife of William Minshall of Whitchurch in the county of Salop gent., Deceased, are both blessed be God in full life and good health at the time of the making hereof In testimony whereof I have caused the publicke seale of our Colony to be hereto affixed the fourteenth day of November in the fifteenth yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lord Charles now King of England &c Annoq'Dui 1639"1648-1650.....William Sargeant was Deacon and Lay Preacher in Malden, Massachusetts. His farm was in that part of Malden which was set off in 1870 as the town of Everett, (now a city). He was commonly called, "Reverand William Sargeant.1654..Purchased 8 acres of land from W. Johnson in Charlestown, Massachusetts. (See History of Malden below.)1656-1657..

William Sargeant and family moved to Barnstable, Massachusetts. He was a Freeman there in 1657 and also Lay Preacher in Barnstable, Massachusetts

The "History of Barnstable County, Massachusetts", edited by Simeon L. Deyo, states:When the number of freemen and voters was recorded in 1670, the commons meadows were ordered sold. The list of freemen and their widows included William Sargeant among others. (Pg. 379.)

On pg. 579 it states that the original name was Monomoyick, and the same year that Mr. Nickerson made his first purchase, the court at Plymouth granted to William Sargeant, among others, the right to purchase of the Indians, lands at Monomoyick and places adjacent.

According to "The Spragues of Malden, Massachusetts" by Chamberlain (pg. 65), the widow and children of Lt. Ralph Sprague appointed William Sargeant and two other men to appraise and apportion the estate of Lt. Ralph Sprague in 1650, which they did Information on William Sargeant from the Encyclopedia of Massachusetts-Biographical-Genealogical, Publ. The American Historical Society Inc. New York and Chicago Pg. 147-148, (Located at the Los Angeles Public Lib.):He (William Sargeant) was a man well calculated and accustomed by his previous standing in England for the office (of lay preacher in Malden) and Johnson, in his "Wonder-working Providence," states: "The people gathered into a church some distance of time before they could attain to any church officer to administer the Seals unto them, yet in the meantime at their Sabbath assemblies they had a godly Christian name Mr. Sargent who did preach the Word to them till 1650." His lands were situated in the southerly part of Mystic Side (or,as it was named in 1649, Malden), on the southerly slope of a hill (later called Belmont Hill), and about one and one-third miles northeast from the river. This land he held as early as 1640 (with the exception of three acres adjoining it, which he purchased in 1654), and it was in that part of Malden, which was afterwards set off, and in 1870 named "Everett" in honor of the distinguished Edward Everett. Upon this land stood the old homestead of the founder, a typical colonial residence, sturdily timbered, built to endure, and long an historic landmark of Massachusetts in the age of the pioneers. This homestead William Sargent bequeathed to his eldest son, John, who in turn divided its use between his sons, Jonathan and Ebenezer, "with all the Land adjoining thereunto, that was his (John's) father, William Sargeants."Still retaining his property at Malden, William Sargent, about the year 1656 or 1657, left that township and established his domicile in Barnstable, and on the 29th of the 4th month, 1658, gave power of attorney to Joseph Hills, a prominent resident of Malden, concerning his property at that place. In 1657 he was made a freeman of Plymouth Colony. In Barnstable, as in Malden, he was a lay preacher, and officiated in the pulpit formerly occupied by the Rev. Dr. Lothrop, deceased, in 1653. It is evident that he leased or rented his Malden property on his removal to Barnstable, for in 1661 he appears as plaintiff in a suit to recover his rent, and a lengthy document in the case, called "Articles of Agreement had, made and concluded on the first day of the 5th month, 1658, Betwixt William Sergeant of Barnstable in the Jurisdiccon of New Plymouth, on the one partie; and James Lane of Malden in the Massachusetts, on the other partie," sets forth under eleven "Items" the conditions of the contract.From a letter written by William Sargeant after his removal to Barnstable, to his friend, Mr. Joseph Hills, of Malden, of which the following is a copy, the annexed fac-simile of his signature was obtained. (see DOC file and FTM Scrapbook for copy of signature). The letter relates to the collection of the rent of a farm in Malden:Reut and Beloued Mr. Joseph Hills after my Xtian salute of yoer self and 2nd selfe with harty acknoledgmt of your curteous and liberal entertainment of vs always togethr with yor forward and ready mind upon al my addresses to bestead me at this distance I am yet further bold to acquaint you how it stands with mee in the point of James Lanes rent for this his last yeere 1660: giuing you a just acct of wt I have receiued.Impr of Henery Euans A Bill as you know to Capt Sauage £2-4-00 of Elcer when my sonn John was ther latter end of last yeer 2-3-00 of Elcer my wif took some smal things in our former jorney 0-8-05 and this time only 2 linen wheels, spinning wheels 0-10-00 ___________ som is £5-05-05
This is all I have recd of my eleuen pounds.I did confer with Job Lane and John Harris of winnisimnet who both referred me to Elcer of boston: affirming they had nothing in yr hands: for I addrest myself to Elcer who told mee he would answer as much as came to 2 pound in case I could stay vntil he culd speak with a certain pson: but I attended his leisure but could not find him at home anj more: he knew wel yt I was to be gone my journey he posest me also wth pmising words yt he would not stick to pay me al yt were behind of Lane's rent in case I would stay vntil he had bills in his hand to doe it I prest him at present but for a set of curtains and vallans for our bed hauing non at present: but I could not reuail: I prest for a little canvis and locarum but all in vain: Sir I doubt vnles you press hard on Job Lane and hold him vnto it I shall hardly attain vnto it: wch if you pleas to doe take 40s of it or wt you pleas to recompens your panes for I am verily agreiued and ashamed to put you upon this trauell and panes for mee soe frequently as I haue hitherto done and stil doe. Sir touching my farm I think Daniel must hold it at least for this yeere myne own condicon of settlemt remaining as yet so Arbitrary and doupfull our brethren intending so far as I can pceiue, another address vnto the Bay Messengers in order to settle things in peace and order amoung vs and I find not in ym a willingnes to release meevntil yt triall be made; after wch I shall wth the first optunity either come or send you an order wt to doe in meane time I entreat to aduis Daniel to be carful to prseru the fruit trees and wt els you think meet. Sir you maj convey either letter or anjthing ells to Mr. Mayor: with safty be sent vnto mee: the vessel being ready to pass awaj I am prest to be somwt inconsideratly breif.Comending you and all your affaires vnto the neur failing guidanee blessing and ptextion of the Albeing Alworking Jehouah: and Rest yors whil: mine: in body (signature) Willm Seargeant (See Media for this signature.)From Barnstab 4th mo. 61. 29th day (April 29, 1661)

ANNETTE CARROLL HAS A PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF WILLIAM SARGEANT'S SIGNATURE FROM THE ABOVE DOCUMENT AS WELL AS A PENCIL DRAWING OF HIS HOME AT "MYSTIC SIDE" (MALDEN, Massachusetts.) IN HER DOCUMENT FILE. BOTH HAVE BEEN SCANNED INTO THIS FAMILY TREE MAKER FILE, IN THE MEDIA SECTION.THE WILL OF WILLIAM SARGEANT: (WILL and INVENTORY...DOC #157)(From the Plymouth Colony Records, at Plymouth, Book of Wills, Vol. 4th, Part 2d, p. 19, the following was transcribed):(Original spelling used.)The last Will and Testament of Mr. William Serjant of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth, exhibited to the Court held att Plymouth aforsaid on the oathes of Mr. Thomas Hinckley assistant and John Chipman Elder as followeth;I William Sarjeant of Barnstable in the Gov'ment of New Plymouth being weak of body but by the Mercye of God of disposing mind and memory; and calling to mind the uncertainty of this Transitory life, and not knowing how soone it may please God to call mee hence, do therefore make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament, heerby revoakeing and adnulling all former and other will or wills heereterfore by mee made either by word or writing; and this only to be accoumpted and accepted as my last will and Testament as followeth.Item, I will and bequeath my soule to God in Jesus Christ my Deare Saviour and onely redeemer and my body to decent buriall; and as to my Temporall estate which God hath bin pleased far above my deserts, to bestow upon mee; my will is that first of all thatt all my just debts which I owe to any p'son or p'sons in right or consience shall be first discharged and satisfyed out of my estate by my executors heerafter named, within convenient time after my decease.Item I will and bequeath to Sarah my loveing wife all my household stuffe and two of my Cowes to be wholy att her dispose, and the use of the new end of my now dwelling house, or the use of one such Room of my house att Maulden, as shee shall chuse in case shee there desire to live during her natural life, and for the further support and stay of liveing I will unto her eight pounds pr annum in current Country pay, to be payed out of the proffitts of my lands by my two sons John and Samuell during her natural life, vid; my son John to pay six pounds therof and my son Samuel forty shillings therof yeerly, and every yeer during her natural life.Item I will and bequeath unto my son John Sergeant my house with all my lands att Maulden. To him and his heirs forever so as hee my said son his heires or assigns, doe well and truely pay or cause to be payed unto Sarah his mother the sume of six pounds pr annum as above mensioned, and after his said mothers decease, the sum of five pounds as a leganse which I will to be payed to my Daughter Hannah Feech within one full year after his mothers my said wife her decease; and five pounds as a legacse I give and bequeath to my Daughter Ruth Bourne within two yeers after my said wifes decease, and five pounds more to my said Daughter Ruth Bourne within three yeers after her my said wifes decease. These Legaces to be payed in currant countrye pay at price currant; as they shall grow due and payable;Item I will and bequeath unto my son Samuell Serjeant my now dwelling house with all my land in Barnstable to him and his heirs forever, so as hee the said Samuell his heirs or assigns doe well abd truely pay or cause to be payed unto the said Sarah is mother forty shillings pr annum in Current Country pay during her natural life, as aforsaid; also I will and bequeath to him the said Samuell my two oxen 2 cowes and a horse with my cart plow and other Tackling thereunto belonging, Item I will to Samuell Bill, my Grandson one heiffer or young horse, and my will is to leave all the rest of my estate in whatsoever it is unto my executors for the payment of my debts, and discharge of my funerall expenses, and I doe hereby appoint and declare Sarah my said loveing wife and my Son John Serjeant aforsaid to be my executors of this my last Will and Testament; and my loveing friends Elder John Chipman and Deacon William Crocker to be ouerseers to see this my last Will and Testament be performed, according to the true intent therof; in witness wherof I have heerunto sett my hand andseal this ninth day of Mach Anno Dom 1679/80 William Serjeant {Seal}Signed sealed and declaredIn presence of Thomas Hinckley John Chipman(It is very interesting to note that the two men William named as overseers of his Will, Elder John Chipman and Deacon William Crocker, are ancestors of Ted Smythe who with his wife, Barbara have been very close and loving friends of William Sargeant's decendant, Herbert Gerald Carroll and his wife, Annette (Strange) Carroll since the 1970s.)The Inventory was sworn to March 3d, 1682/3, and amounted to L309.14.9."The House and land at Maulden according to the information we have from John Searjeant, besides what John Sarjeant hath added to it L176.00.00."WILLIAM SARGEANT'S WILL INVENTORY:A true inventory of all and regular the goods and chattels and credditts of Mr. William Sarjeant, deceased, appraised att his house in Barnstable the six and twentyth day of February, one thousand six hundred eithty and two by James Lewis and Joseph Haythorpe and exhibited to the court of his Matie (Majestie) held at Plymouth the sixth of March Anno dom 1682/1683. Pounds Shillings PenceItem his Purse and Apparell 07 05 00 " his books 04 06 00 " 2 oxen 06 00 00 " 4 Cowes 09 00 00 " two Cowes att Linn 04 10 00 " 1-3 year old heiffer 01 15 00 " 2-two year old Meat Cattle 02 10 00 " 2 Calves 01 05 00 " 6 sheep and 5 lambes a year ol 02 15 00 " 2 mares 01 10 00 " 1 marre and a horse Colt 01 00 00 " in (?) swine 01 40 00 " a parte in a smale old hay boate 01 17 00 " 1 bed and beding and bedsted 04 10 00 " 1 bed and beding 03 00 00 " 1 bed and beding 04 00 00 " 1 Fliche bed 00 10 00 " one spinning (Cinnil?) 03 10 00 " a piece of New broad clot 01 10 00 " in pewter 01 12 00 " in tining ware 00 05 00 " in brass ware 03 05 00 " in Iron pott and kettle and pothoo 00 12 00 " in other Iron ware 01 03 00 " in armes and amunition 00 17 00 " in earthin ware 00 02 03 " in Chests boxes and cubbard 01 04 00 " 2 silver spoones and 3 old alcomy spoones 00 12 06 " in Tubbs, pailes and old barrells 00 18 06 " a smoothing Iron Glasse bottles and seives 00 06 06 " in Chairs and Cushins 00 08 00 " in 2 bed steads 00 13 00 " an old Gridiron, old bellowes, a Cowbel and an old sythe 00 06 00 " a spinning wheel, a hatchill and a lamp00 02 00 " a parcell of sheep woole and some other old thinges 00 06 00 " a Cart and wheels, plow, Irons, a Chaine and draught Geares 03 00 00 " some other old things 00 02 00 " in corn and other provisions that the family will need before a New supply will come 06 00 00 " the house and land in Barnstable 50 00 00 " the house and land at Maulden according to the information wee have from John Serjeant besides what John Serjeant hath added to it 176 00 00 " an old frying pan, pestill and spice morter 00 02 06 Som totall 309 14 09The estate is Indebted according as wee are informed by John Serjeant amountsto ........................................................ 18 10 0 Joseph Caythorpe James LewisSamuell Sarjeant appeered and took oath that this is a true Inventory of his deceased father's estate so farr as he knowes this third of March 1682 (1683) Before mee Barnabas Caythorp Assistant

THE "HAY BOATE" MENTIONED IN THE INVENTORY ABOVE WAS USED IN OBTAINING SALT HAY FROM THE SALT MARSHES THAT SURROUND BARNSTABLE, MASS. IT GREW WILD AND WAS USED TO FEED THEIR CATTLE. THE SALT HAY MARSHES STILL EXSIST TODAY IN LARGE NUMBER AND WERE SEEN BY HERBERT AND ANNETTE CARROLL ON A VISIT TO BARNSTABLE AND THE CAPE COD AREA IN MASSACHUSETTS IN JUNE, 1991.(The following is taken from GENEOLOGY OF THE SARGEANT FAMILY, DECENDANTS OF WILLIAM OF MALDEN, MASS. by Aaron Sargent, 1858, pg. 11 and 12. A photocopy of this book is in the possession of Annette Strange Carroll.)The farm at Malden, given to John Sargent, in the will was owned by William as early as 1649,--and perhaps earlier,--with the exception of eight acres southwest of and adjoining his own land, which he purchased in 1654. It was on a hill in the southerly part of the town, about one and a half miles northeast from Malden Bridge, and is now intersected by the Newburyport turnpike.John, by deed of gift, in 1708, gave part of the house, (balance of house to his wife, in his will,) and "all the land adjoining that was my father William Sargeant's" to his sons Jonathan and Ebenezer, who divided the same in 1720; Jonathan then retaining the southerly portion, with parts of the buildings, and Ebenezer retaining the northerly portion, with the "east ends" of the buildings. Jonathan, in 1735, gave a quarter of an acre of his part, "in the southerly part of Malden," "being part of my homestead whereon now I dwell," with a road twenty-six feet wide to the highway, to the "Inhabitants of the southerly part of Malden for a Meeting House."Ebenezer, in 1736, sold land "received from my father by deed of gift, being the homestead;" and describes it as being bounded on the south and southwest by the Meetinghouse and the way to the Meetinghouse; and, as his part of the estate was the northerly part, it may be inferred that the Meetinghouse was near the centre of the whole farm. Near the former site of the Meetinghouse, and south from it, now stands an old, dilapidated, unpainted house, which, there is much reason for believing, was the residence of the first three generations of the family. It certainly was occupied by members of the three succeeding generations. No part of the place is now in the possession of any member of the family.William Sargeant is buried in the Lothrop Hill Cemetery in Barnstable, Mass. on Routh 6A. He is buried in a mass grave along with the original settlers and their Pastor, Rev. Lothrop. They had been originally buried at "Calves Pasture" where the first Meeting House was. This was located where the Lothrop Hill Cem. now stands. Annette and Herbert (Jerry) Carroll have a photograph of the common marker of this mass grave at the cemetery, taken during a visit to Barnstable, Mass. in June 1991. The Tercentenary marker on the stone wall reads: Grave of John Lothrop (etc). Also graves of first settlers removed from Calves Pasture Point. (from "The Seven Villages of Barnstable" 1976 Pg.60-62 - Publ. by the Town of Barnstable)Rev. Lothrop came to Barnstable with his church congregation from Scituate, Mass. After the death of Rev. Lothrop in 1653, William Sargeant was one of the men who filled the pulpit before a new pastor was called. William was called by the conservative element of the church. (From Barnstable, Three Centuries of a Cape Cod Town, Donald G. Trayser, pg. 19)During a visit in June 1991, Herbert and Annette also worshipped at the West Parish Church, West Barnstable, Mass., which is the outgrowth of the original Meeting House where William Sargeant was Lay Preacher in Barnstable.Annette Carroll and her good friend, Barbara Smythe, were also able to do research during that time at the Sturgis Library in Barnstable (originally the home of Rev. Lothrop).

MUCH IS WRITTEN ABOUT WILLIAM SARGENT OF MALDEN, MASSACHUSETTS. ANNETTE (STRANGE) CARROLL HAS MANY COPIES OF MATERIALS CONCERNING HIM IN HER POSSESSION INCLUDING PARISH RECORDS FROM ENGLAND, HIS WILL AND INVENTORY AND OTHER PAPERS.Children of William and Hannah Sargeant: (From "English Ancestry") Hannah b. in England, M. in 1649, Hency Felch (Feech), of Reading; d. 15 Dec 1717 Elizabeth(1) b. in England, m. about 1651, David Nicols; m. 14 Jan 1652/3, Thomas Bill of Boston; d. 5 Mar 1657/8 Elizabeth(2) MaryChildren of William and Mary/Marie Sargeant:Mary, b. 1634/37 and baptized January 22, 1636/37, All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. She died in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts November, 1671. When she was age 20, she married Allen Breed in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts. Her ancestor, Kristin C. Hall, e-mail addr.,Kristen@media.mit.edu. She also has a website on the familyBook: Who Begot Thee? (found on Googlebooks). By Gilbert Oliver Bent, 1903. (Biography of the Sargent Family): "William Sargent, 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, (who was son of Hugh), the Mayor of Northhampton, England, in 1626. Hugh Sargent married Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Gifford of the ancient and distinguish family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in September 1632. Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, co of Salop, gentleman and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire*. William Sargent came to America from Northhampton, England in 1638 with his newly married wife Sarah and two daughters by his first wife. He settled in Charlestown, (MA), in that part which afterwards became the town of Malden, (MA), where he was a lay preacher in 1648-50. He was also a Deacon and active citizen. He removed to Barnstable, (MA), Dec 16, 1682. His widow died January 12, 1689. Hannah Sargent, 1629-1717. Daughter of William (and first wife, Hannah). Born in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 to Henry Felch. Died December 15, 1717. Her sister (half-sister), Ruth, married (1) Jonathan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, who's first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came over in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth Chipman died in Sandwich, (MA), in 1713. In her will she left her bequests to "the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading".Information regarding the history of Malden, Massachusetts:History of MaldenIt's hard to imagine now, but over 300 years ago, English scouting parties moved cautiously through an unknown wilderness. Today, the wilderness has evolved into the bustling city of Malden. In 1629, a section of hilly woodlands north of the Mystic River, was purchashed from the Pawtucket Indians, and called Mystic Side. It was incorporated into the township of Charlestown. But by 1649, residents of Mystic Side had petitioned the General Court to let them form a separate township, to be called Malden. The town was named after a community of the same name in Essex, England. Some of the most prominent citizens of Malden, Massachusetts had emigrated from that English town.By the early eighteenth century, Malden Village was, according to an English visitor, "fruitful and well cultivated, being entirely cleared and enclosed with stone fences." In order to survive, the citizens of the new village had to be resourceful.Besides engaging in farming, they were also fishermen on the Mystic River, and worked as woodsmen in north Malden. Inhabitants numbered aound 1000 at the time. During the revolutionary period, citizens of Malden were early activists in the struggle against the oppression of England. In 1770 they voted to stop using tea until the notorious Revenue Acts were repealed.In fact, Malden was the first town in the Commonwealth to petition the Colonial Government to secede from England.
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REVEREND WILLIAM SARGENT (1602-1682) - Northampton, Northamptonshire, England;
Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts; Malden, Middlesex county, Massachusetts;
Barnstable, Plymouth county, Massachusetts
(Third Generation - Sargent Family)
FATHER MOTHER
ROGER SARGENT ELLEN MAKERNES
BIRTH AND BAPTISM
William was born in 1602 and was baptized in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England on 20 June 1602[6].
DEATH AND BURIAL
He died in Barnstable, Barnstable county, Massachusetts on 16 December 1682; he was 80[6].
OCCUPATION AND CHURCH MEMBERSHIP
William was first a haberdasher. When he migrated to New England, he became first a deacon and later a lay preacher at Malden, Middlesex county, Massachusetts and Barnstable, Plymouth county, Massachusetts[6,9]. Even though he was a lay preacher, he is commonly referred to as "Reverend William Sargent". He was admitted to the church in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts on 10 March 1638/9[9,13]. His migration from his English established life and
subsequent occupation as a lay preacher seem to indicate that William became a rather staunch Puritan.
TOWN SERVICE
He appeared to first follow in his father's political footsteps and was elected Senior Bailiff of Northampton in 1632-3.
FREEMANSHIP
William first made Freeman in England at Northampton on 20 July 1626, at which time he is called the "son of Roger Sargent"[6]. In America, William took the Oath of Freeman on 2
May 1639 in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts[10,11,12] and made freeman in Plymouth Colony in 1657[9].
RESIDENCES AND MIGRATION
Like his father, he lived in All Saints parish, Northamptonshire, England[6]. His name appears for the last time in the parish register of All Saints on 22 January 1636/7 at the baptism of his
daughter Mary[6]. Although the details of his migration are currently lost, he had settled in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts by 1638/9. He was still in Charlestown in 1654, when he bought 8 & MIGRATION 1638/9. He was still in Charlestown in 1654, when he bought 8 acres from W. Johnson[13]. He later removed to Malden, Middlesex county, Massachusetts -- which is the part of Malden that became the city of Everett. Finally, he removed to Barnstable,
Barnstable county, Massachusetts in 1656 or 1657[9].
ESTATE
William's will was written on 9 March 1679/80 and is also reprinted in Aaron Sargent's book[9]. The will was proven on 3 March 1682/3 and devised to his wife and six children[13].
MARRIAGE #1
Circa 1627 when William was 25, he first married Hannah [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21]. Hannah died
in 1632 and was buried on 25 September 1632 in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14].
CHILDREN
28. i. Elizabeth1 SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
29. ii. Hannah SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
30. iii. Elizabeth2 SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
31. iv. Mary SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
MARRIAGE
#2 Circa 1634 when William was 32, he second married Mary/Marie [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14,22,18,23,24]. She died circa 1637 in
Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6].
CHILDREN
32. i. Mary SARGENT Please see her own page.
33. ii. Sarah SARGENT We know nothing more of this child.
MARRIAGE
#3 Sometime before 17 March 1638/9, when "Rev. William Serjeant" was 36, he third married Sarah [surname not known], in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts [6,13,14,18,24,25,26,27,28,29,30]. She was admitted to the church at Charlestown on 17 March 1638/9[9,13].
CHILDREN
34. i. John SARGENT - John was born in 1639 and baptized in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts on 8d:10m (December):1639.
35. ii. Ruth SARGENT - Ruth was born in 28d:8m(October):1642 in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts
36. iii. Samuel SARGENT - Samuel was born on 3d:1m (March):1644/5 in Charlestown,
Suffolk county, Massachusetts
SOURCES 1. Edward Carroll Death Record, 19 October 1899, Lynn, Essex
county, Massachusetts, 1866, 192, p. 186, #337.
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Who Begot Thee? Some Genealogical and Historical Notes Made in an Effort (Sargent Family)
1602-1713, England to Malden, Massachusetts
Book: Who Begot Thee? (found on Googlebooks)

"William Sargent. 1602-1682. Son of Roger Sargent, who was son of Hugh, the Mayor of Northhampton, England, in 1626. Hugh Sargent married Margaret, daughter of Nicholas Gifford of the ancient and distinguish family of Gifford, seated at Honfleur, Normandy, in the eighth century. William Sargent was baptized June 20, 1602. Married (1) Hannah, who died in September 1632. Married (2) Marie, who died about 1637. Married (3) in 1638 Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, co of Salop, gentleman and formerly of Bunbury in Cheshire*. William Sargent came to America from Northhampton, England in 1638 with his newly married wife Sarah and two daughters by his first wife. He settled in Charlestown, in that part which afterwards became the town of Malden, where he was a lay preacher in 1648-50. He was also a Deacon and active citizen. He removed to Barnstable December 16, 1682. His widow died January 12, 1689.

HANNAH SARGENT. 1629-1717. Daughter of William. Born in England. Baptized July 13, 1629. Married in 1649 to Henry Felch. Died December 15, 1717. Her sister Ruth, married (1) Jonathan Winslow, (2) Richard Bourne, (3) John Chipman, who's first wife was Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland who came over in the "Mayflower." John Chipman died April 7, 1708. Ruth Chipman died in Sandwich in 1713. In her will she left her bequests to "the daughters of my sister Felch at Reading."
Pages 23-24
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Reverend William Sargent 1600's, England and Massachusetts
Rev. William Sargent (1602-1694)

William was first a haberdasher (hat maker). When he migrated to New England, he became a deacon and later a lay preacher at Malden, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and Barnstable, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Even though he was a lay preacher, he is commonly referred to as "Reverend William Sargent". He was admitted to the church in Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts on 10 March 1638/9. His migration from his English established life and subsequent occupation as a lay preacher seem to indicate that William became a rather staunch Puritan.

He appeared to first follow in his father's political footsteps and was elected Senior Bailiff of Northampton in 1632-3.William first made Freeman in England at Northampton on 20 July 1626, at which time he is called the "son of Roger Sargent". In America, William took the Oath of Freeman on 2 May 1639 in Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts and made freeman in Plymouth Colony in 1657.

Like his father, he lived in All Saints parish, Northamptonshire, England. His name appears for the last time in the parish register of All Saints on 22 January 1636/7 at the baptism of his daughter Mary. Although the details of his migration are currently lost, he had settled in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts by 1638/9.

Circa 1627 when William was 25, he first married Hannah [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. Hannah died in 1632 and was buried on 25 September 1632 in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. They had 4 daughters.

Circa 1634 when William was 32, he second married Mary/Marie [surname not known], in All Saints, Northampton, Northamptonshire, England[6,14,22,18,23,24]. She died circa 1637 in Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. They had two daughters, Mary and Sarah.

Sometime before 17 March 1638/9, when "Rev. William Serjeant" was 36, he third married Sarah [surname not known], in Charlestown, Suffolk county, Massachusetts. She was admitted to the church at Charlestown on 17 March 1638/9. They had two sons, John and Samuel, and one daughter, Ruth.

William's will was written on 9 March 1679/80 and is also reprinted in Aaron Sargent's book, Sargent Genealogy of 1895. The will was proven on 3 March 1682/3 and devised to his wife and six children.
found on ancestry.com


Plymouth County History 1682, Barnstable
Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691
Part Three: Biographical Sketches
Biographical Sketches
Sargent, Williamxxx —Baptized at Northampton, Northamptonshire, on 20 June 1602, William Sargent died at Barnstable, 16 December 1682. His first wife Hannah _____ died in England, as did probably his second wife Mary _____. He was last recorded in England on 22 January 1636/37 (baptism of a daughter) and first recorded in New England at Charlestown, where he and his third wife Sarah were admitted as church members 10 March 1638/39. An entry in Lechford's Notebook, p. 224, gives a certificate by Governor Winthrop regarding William Sargent of Charlestown, a haberdasher of hats, from Northampton, England, and his wife Sarah, widow of William Minshall of Whitchurch, County Salop. Sargent moved first to Malden, and then, ca. 1656 or 1657, to Barnstable. He was made a Bay freeman in 1639 and was a lay preacher in Malden and Barnstable. G. Andrews Moriarty gives documentary evidence in a series of articles in NEHGR 74:231, 267, 75:57, 129, 79:358, tracing William Sargent's line back to English royalty.
found on ancestry.com


William Sargent, First American Ancestor 1638, Charlestown, Massachusetts
From Sargent Geneaology
American Lineage chapter
William Sargent, the ancestor of the family in America, came from Northampton, In England, to Charlestown, in New England with his third wife, Sarah, and two daughters by his first wife, in 1638.

The plantation at Salem had been begun in 1628 by John Endicott and others, who came over from England to make preparations for the settlement of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Several persons, by his permission, travelled in a westerly direction about 12 miles through the woods and came to a neck of land between the Charles and Mystic Rivers, called by the natives Mishawum. Having obtained consent, they settled there and agreed to call the new settlement Charlestown. As early as 1629 Ralph Sprague and others, living in Charlestown, crossed the river to explore the country, and found an uncouth wilderness inhabited by the Pawtucket Indians. A settlement was afterwards made at Mystic Side, that is on the north side of Mystic River, as a part of Charlestown, and William Sargent and his family made their domicile there. He was admitted to the church in Charlestown, March 10, 1638/9; and his wife was admitted the following Sunday. He was made a freeman of Massachusetts Bay Colony the same year.

William’s farm was in the southerly part of Mystic Side, or Malden, on the southerly slope of a hill, afterwards called Belmont Hill, about one and a third miles northeast from the river. The farm was owned by him as early as 1640 with the exception of 8 acres southwest of and adjoining the original farm, which he purchased in 1654. It was on both sides of what was afterwards the Newburyport Turnpike, which having been abandoned as a turnpike, became a town highway, called Broadway. This part of the town was set off from Malden in 1870 and named Everett in honor of Edward Everett, the distinguished statesman and orator. The town was incorporated as a city in 1893.
(See illustration of house at Mystic Side.)

The picture presented is of the house built by William Sargent, and bequeathed by him in his will to his son John. If it is not an exact representation, it has the merit of being as near. . .to the original. . . The right-hand or east part of the picture, including the door and chimney was standing until about 1890 and the picture is from a photographic copy.
found on ancestry.com


The Sargent Family Worthy of Note The Sargent family is worthy of note as one of the very few colonial fully proven to be of royal descent. This was demonstrated with great detail and accuaracy by G. Andrews Moriarty, one America's greatest genealogists, in a series of articals in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 74:231-237; 75:57-63; and 79:358-378. As a result of Moriarty's research, the line of Reverend William Sargent of Charlestown, Massachusetts Bay Colony, can be traced back generation by generation to King Alfred the Great.

"The marriage of William Sargent's son, John Sargent, to Lydia Chapman, daughter of John and Hope (Howland) Chipman, and granddaughter of Pilgrims John and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland, united a Pilgrim line with a royal English line. William Sargent, the first of the line in America, a lay minister, was by trade a haberdasher, and by rank a gentleman. One of the biggest hurdles in colonial genalogy is to bridge the gap of the Atlantic and positively prove that the American immigrant is identical with a person in England. This is done for the Reverend William Sargent by an entry in Lechford's "Notebook," Cambridge,1885, pg. 224, where Governor John Winthrop mentions 'William Sargent late of Northhampton [England], haberdasher of Hatts and now of Charlestown in New England.' Winthrop refers to him by the title 'gentleman'. A parish record of Courteenhall, near Northampten, in Northampton, in Northamptonshire, England, helps connect William Sargent to his grandmother, Margaret Gifford, a member of the noble Gifford (or Giffard) family which Moriaty calls 'one of the most ancient and distinguished families of England'. Margaret's father, Nichcolas Gifford, was listed in 1538 one of the gentlemen to attend upon King Henry VIII's household. He was an assistant to Thomas Cromwell in the dissolution of the monastaries. His grandfather married Agnes Winslow, of an armigerous Winslow family which genealogists have been trying in vain for many years to show show as ancestors of Plymouth Governor Edward Winslow. Through Agnes Winslow, the Gifford family goes back to the family of Sir John Throckmorton who was Under- Treasurer of England in the reign of King Henry VI. The Throckmorton family at one time was thought to descend through a female (Bedsford) linefrom a royal line going back to William the Conqueror. Serious doubt has been caste on a vital connection of this line in a recent article in The Genealogist, 1:27. Although the line is still found in the 5th edition of Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists, 1976, Baltimore, it will be cut in the next edition.

"Carrying the Giffords still further back, we find that John Gifford's great, great-grandfather married Lucy de Morteymn and Moriarty in his articles, as well as Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists, demonstrate that she was a great (5 times) granddaughter of Gospatric II, 2nd Earl of Dunbar, whose paternal grandfather, Maldred, was a brother of King Duncan, who had been murdered by his cousin Macbeth. Gospatric II's great grandmother was Elgiva, the daughter of King Ethelred II, whose great, great-grandfather was King Alfred the Great.

"Lucy de Morteyn's husband was Sir John Gifford, whose great, great-grandfather, Elias Giffard, married Matilda FitzHarding, of the family which owned Berkeley Castle, where King Edward II was murdered. Elias'es mother, Berta, was one of the noble Clifford family, and a great-aunt of 'Fair Rosamund' the ill-fated mistress of of King Henry II. Elias'es great-grandfather, Osbern Giffard, was believed, but not with complete certainty, to have been with William the Conquerer at the Battle of Hastings. Moriarty once though Osbern was a younger brother to Walter Giffard, who was known to have fought at Hastings, but both Moriaty and Sir Anthony Wagner, Garter King of Arms, later came to believe that Osbern was Walter's nephew.

"The myriad of strands from this Sargent-Gifford line provide a fascinating interconnecting fabric spreading all over the history of England. One more example of these interesting connections can be seen in the background of Matilda FitzHarding, mentioned above, whose great-gandfather, Harding, was son of Eadnoth, the Saxon staller, or chamberlain, of King Edward the Confessor. The line going back to Eadnoth is Not a royal line, which makes it of special note.
[Source: L. G. Pine's "Sons of the Conqueror", Charles Tuttle Co., 1973, page 98]
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