Saturday, August 11, 2012

ELLEN OLDHAM (BICKMORE) 1847-1907

[Ancestral Link: Mary Elizabeth Bickmore (Schow) daughter of Ellen Oldham (Bickmore).]


Isaac and Ellen Oldham Bickmore Memorial, East Face, 12 April 2008, Paradise Cemetery, Paradise, Cache, Utah

Inscription "Isaac D. Bickmore Born Sept. 2 1838 Died November 12 1920 Ellen O. Bickmore Born October 1 1847 Died January 5, 1907 BICKMORE" on Bottom Isaac and Ellen's headstones are directly behind this.


Copy of photo of family group of 4 men and three women with two oval inserts of two women between the three people standing on back row. Typewritten on top of photo John and Maria Heap Oldham Family About 1904 Utah. Typewritten on bottom of photo Seated; L to R -Thomas - Alice O. Mitton - Maria O. Tams - Samuel Heap Standing L to R - James Henry - Ellen O. Bickmore - John Oldham Jr. On the Wall L to R - Eliza O. Remmington - Margret Ann O. Crapo. Photo taken about 1904.




Death certificate.

Ellen Oldham Bickmore grave marker, Paradise Cemetery, Paradise, Cache, Utah.


HISTORY OF ELLEN OLDHAM BICKMORE
Copied from history in possession of Kate Haskins, Logan, Utah

Ellen Oldham Bickmore was born in Bury, Lancshire, England, 1 October 1847. She was the sixth of ten children of John and Maria Heap Oldham. Her parents were native to the Lancshire area having been born and married there. The Oldham family for two generations had engaged in the weaving trade. The weaving was done by manual labor in their own home. The invention and development of power looms run by steam made a great change for the people engaged in this trade. The power looms were accompanied by great opposition on the part of the people who had been using hand looms and felt threatened by the new invention. Great Grandfather Oldham did not feel this way, and acquired seven looms and employed people to manipulate them.

Ellen was involved in the family at an early age. She and the rest of the children all worked at the looms in factories as they were growing up. The family lived in the town next to a large factory with a smoke stack, and desired to move from this home not only because of the smoke, but because they felt that the swaying stack would fall down on their home.

In 1844 the Oldham family joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Not only did this immediately influence their lives, but also lead to the family leaving the weaving trade and England. On May 18, 1864, Ellen, along with seven brothers and sisters left England with their parents. They embarked at Liverpool for New York on the sailing vessel “General McClellan.”

Two of her older brothers were already in America. The eldest, William had been killed in battle at South Mountain, Maryland, in the Civil War, two years before the family came to America. John, the other brother, had already arrived in Utah the year before to purchase land for the family’s future home. Ellen was seventeen years of age when she made the voyage.

During the voyage two events transpired which lent excitement as well as serious apprehension to all on board. About one o’clock in the morning the tarred rigging of the ship took fire from a spark from the cook's galley. This fire spread with increasing rapidity among the ropes and sails, and when some one raised the cry of fire, great excitement prevailed. A few days later when the ship was passing near the Banks of Newfoundland, she struck an iceberg. This happened at four o’clock in the morning, when the watch on deck had retired. The shock was so great that all on board were instantly awakened. It was thought that the ship was sinking but she gradually righted herself. The great rent in her prow caused by contact with the iceberg was soon covered with tarpaulin and timbers to prevent the high seas from dashing it. Fortunately the weather was fair until they arrived at New York. They landed at Castle Garden having been thirty-one days in voyage. In the evening of the day they arrived, they took passage on the steam boat, “St John” for Albany. There they took the train and for seven days and nights threaded their way across the Eastern and middle states to St Joseph, Missouri. They landed at a little village, “Wyoming,” Nebraska, a short distance from Omaha.

After resting there about three weeks, Ellen’s family started on the journey across the plains in Captain Warren’s ox train. Parts of the journey were hazardous. The parents were both sick for about three weeks. During the first part of the trip the Indians were a constant threat, and during the last part nutritious food was very scarce. Ellen’s memory of the trip was quite positive, however. She remarked that for her it was not a hardship because she loved the company of the other young people and the nights of singing and dancing.

After remaining two or three weeks in Salt Lake City, the family moved to Paradise in the northern part of Utah. When they arrived it was 20 weeks after leaving England. Since it was the end of October when they arrived, work was in short supply. The family immediately faced the problem of food for the winter. The difficulty was lessened by Bishop David James, who called the men of the Ward together and asked them to make such advances to the incoming immigrants as they could afford. A liberal amount of meat, potatoes, flour and other staples were given to the family. As soon as possible Ellen’s father paid back his debts to his brothers.

During the winter Ellen’s father returned to the weaving trade, as cloth for men and women’s clothing was extremely scarce and expensive. Ellen and the other children helped again in weaving. For many years Ellen’s father continued at this trade. He counted as his year’s work one thousand yards of cloth, and when this was accomplished, he felt as though his vacation had been well earned.

In the later part of the summer of 1866, great clouds of grasshoppers flew upon the town and fields surrounding it, and commenced feeding upon the crops. Considerable loss was inflicted this first season. The insects hatched from the eggs, and destroyed practically all the crops that were planted. Thus, it continued alternatively for six years. One year the insects would fly in early and destroy half the crop and lay their eggs. The next year the eggs would hatch and the crops would be almost entirely destroyed before the grasshoppers obtained sufficient growth to fly away. This was known as the Grasshopper War, and had the effect of keeping the people poor and unable to build up their surroundings as far as they would otherwise would have done.

During 1866 Ellen met Isaac Danford Bickmore, and after a short courtship married in a civil ceremony on New Year’s Eve.

Immediately after their marriage they made their home in Wellsville, Utah, but the following winter they moved, settling in Paradise, where Ellen’s husband became a farmer.

Ellen’s brothers, Thomas and John, had left Utah and moved to Kansas to farm. Letters came to Ellen and Danford trying to persuade them that life would be better for them in Kansas. Danford finally decided that the family should seriously investigate the brothers offer. In the summer of 1880 they sold their farm in Paradise and went to Kansas where Thomas and John Oldham lived. At this time Ellen and Danford had six children: Martha, Danford Jr., John, Ellen, Newman, and Thomas.

After the making of the difficult decision to move, selling the farm land, and transporting eight people such a long way, the family was anticipating a new and much better place to live. Perhaps Ellen would have been content to stay by her family in Utah, but Danford desired the new opportunity and possible adventure.

When the family arrived in Kansas, their disappointment was great. The brothers had greatly exaggerated their situation in Kansas, possibly because they so wanted Ellen and Danford with them. The Bickmore’s had given up the security they had and found little to be excited about upon their arrival. Food was scarce, often meal after meal would consist of potatoes and bread. The family had made a mistake. Now Danford looked toward Texas as a possible new home for his family. Ellen was to move back to Utah while her husband worked on the new railroad and earned money for the land in Texas. They traveled together as far as Gunnison, Colorado. Ellen and the children then took the train to Utah. Danford bought wagons and teams and worked on the construction of the railroad.

Ellen arrived in Paradise in the early fall. New sorrow was soon to follow and this tragedy would determine their home for many years. A short time after her arrival Thomas, not quite one year old, became sick and died. The next month David Bickmore, her brother-in-law died and left a wife and six children. Word was sent to Danford but he was very sick with pneumonia in Colorado at the time and could not get home immediately. When he was well, he felt that the plans for Texas must be dropped and he returned to Paradise to settle and help with his brother’s family. Danford and David had been very fond of one another. Danford felt that he must return and take his brother’s place. The weight must have been very great on Danford, now there were eleven children and two women dependent upon him.

When Ellen’s husband returned they again settled in Paradise on a farm about five blocks northeast of the Paradise Co-op Store. Two more children were born, Elizabeth and William. Ellen’s life in Paradise was a relatively quiet one. Her time could now be spent doing those things she liked best. She was an example of the hard-working, industrious, religious farm woman that was typical of this time.

Her home was one that was remembered for its home-makers atmosphere. Her culinary skills were well known. The kitchen was never without a full crock of sour cream, molasses, and caraway cookies. A special treat seen by the grandchildren was fresh whipped cream cakes, four or five layers high.

Much of her social life centered around sewing bees. Her sisters and friends gathers at her long dining room table for an afternoon of fun and conversation which could be justified by the useful production of rugs.

The money that came from the sale of butter and eggs was Ellen’s to do with as she saw fit. The first donation to be taken care of was tithing paid to the church. This she did by donating butter which was always individually marked with a rose symbol.

During the period of time that the Logan temple was being built, she organized the “Sunday egg fund.” Profits of which were given to the church for the Temple.

The picture that comes to the minds of those who remembered her was one of a kindly, hard-working family woman, always wearing a long white apron with lace and embroidery. She was surrounded by her children when they had families of their own, and she always attended each illness and birth. She was always remembered for her good cooking and skillful sewing and weaving. She helped her mother with the sock-knitting from the time she was four years old. Ellen was a woman who seemed content with her lot in life. The writings left by her children suggest that she was also seen by them as a devoted, dominate woman who took an active part in shaping their lives both by teaching and by example.

In 1904, Danford and Ellen sold the farm and bought a home in Logan, Utah. In the latter part of 1906, water from the corral drained toward the house and contaminated the water in the kitchen sink pump. Ellen and sons Danford, Newman, and William contracted typhoid fever and all were sick for about six weeks. On January 5, 1907 Ellen Oldham Bickmore died from the disease.

Funeral services were held at Paradise and eulogies of praise and honor were given in respect to her exemplary life and character. Her many friends and associates formed a large cortege that followed her remains to the Paradise Cemetery. She was buried Jan 8, 1907.

Submitted to the Daughter’s of the Utah Pioneers by Afton Clayson, 456 North 400 East, Brigham City, Utah 84302.


BIOGRAPHY OF ELLEN OLDHAM BICKMORE
Ellen Oldham Bickmore was born at Bury Lancashire England on Friday, October 1st, 1847. She was the sixth child of John and Maria Heap Oldham, both of whom were born and also married at Haslington Lancashire, England. They became members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the year 1844, a year made memorable in the history of that Church on account of the martyrdom of its founder and prophet, Joseph Smith.

The husband and father was a weaver and he and the children as they became old enough were generally employed in one or another of the cotton factories.

On the 18th day of May 1864, the family left their native land to gather with the Saints in Utah. They embarked at Liverpool for New York on the sailing vessel General McClellen. During the voyage two events transpired which lent excitement as well as serious apprehension to all on board. About one o’clock in the morning the tarred rigging of the ship took fire from a spark from the cooks galley. The fire spread with increasing rapidity among the ropes and sails and when some one raised the cry of fire, great excitement prevailed. The fire was confined to the rigging, however, and was soon extinguished.

A few days later when the ship was passing near the Banks of Newfoundland, she struck an iceberg. This happened at four o’clock in the morning, when all the “watch” on deck had retired. The shock was so great that all on board were instantly awakened. It was thought that the ship was sinking, but she gradually righted herself. The great rent in her prow caused by contact with the iceberg was soon covered with tarpaulin and timbers to hide the unsightliness and also prevent the higher waves from dashing in. Fortunately, the weather was fair until they arrived at New York.

They landed at Castle Garden having been thirty one days on voyage. In the evening of the day they landed, they took passage on the Steam Boat St. John for Albany. There they took train and for seven days and nights treaded their way across the Eastern and Middle States to St. Joseph, Missouri and landed at the little village of Wyoming a short distance from Omaha. After waiting there three weeks they began that long and tiresome journey across the plains to Utah with ox teams. The company with which they traveled was under the direction of Captain Warren. They were eleven weeks on the plains arriving at Salt Lake City, Utah October 4th, 1864. After resting a few days they again resumed their journey to Paradise in Cache Valley, where they began to found a home. Thus twenty two weeks had elapsed from the time they left their home in England until they arrived at Paradise. Under the most favorable conditions in those early pioneer days the trip from Council Bluffs to Utah would necessarily be hazardous as well as wearisome, on account of the hostility of the Indians, but to undertake such a journey with a family of nine and travel in a caravan of slow moving ox teams across more than a thousand miles of uninhabited territory (except the scattered tribes of Indians) in an undertaking that must ever testify of the faith of those early pioneers of the divine mission of the Prophet Joseph Smith.

In the year 1865 Ellen Oldham the subject of this sketch, became acquainted and after a short courtship was married to Isaac D. Bickmore on New Years Eve 1865. He as the son of Isaac Bickmore one of the early veterans of the Mormon Church.

Immediately after their marriage they made their home at Wellsville Utah, but the following summer, 1866, they moved and settled at Paradise. Here they improved and tilled their farm and reared their children.

In the summer of 1880 they sold their farm at Paradise and later that year went to Kansas where John and Thomas Oldham (brothers to Ellen) lived. The following March, 1881, they bought an outfit of horses and mules and again started westward intending to settle in Texas but the decree of fate or more probably the interposition of Divine Providence interposed. After traveling westward as far as Gunnison, Colorado, Mr. Bickmore took employment for himself and teams on the construction of the railroad then being build through Gunnison, and Ellen and the children took train for Paradise, Utah, her husband still intending later that fall to go to Texas and locate a home and then send for the family. The death at Paradise of his brother, David, and his youngest son, Thomas, and he having just recovered from a severe illness, he decided also to return to Utah for the winter. The following spring 1882 they bought a home at Paradise where they lived until their family of seven were reared to manhood and womanhood.

In 1905 they sold their farm at Paradise and moved to Logan, Utah, where she died after a prolonged illness January 5, 1907. Impressive funeral services were held at Paradise and eulogies of praise and honor were given in respect to her exemplary life and character. A profusion of floral tributes surrounded the bier as the last tokens of deepest regard from her many friends and associations. A large cortege followed her remains to the Paradise cemetery where her body was laid January 8, 1907.

She was a woman of the highest ideals, noble, honorable and generous, a devoted and affectionate wife and mother. Her ethical standards were of the highest order and she verily lived up to those standards in all her daily walks through life. Here was one of those intellectually strong tough gentle and lovable dispositions who forgot self in her solicitation for the welfare of others. She was one of the honorable women of the earth; faithful to her God and her earthly calling, generous to friends, hospitable to strangers and charitable to all, doing good that goodness might increase in the earth.

May the glory of the righteous be her portion and may she reign in the Celestial Sphere as queen over a numerous posterity in the realms of her father and God.

“It is for this glorious purpose
Thou has laid thy body down
That thy dust be animated
And thy head yet wear a crown
And thy children cluster near, near thee
Loving as in days of yore
And our father’s fond affection
Circle us forever more.”


Chapter 5
Ellen Oldham Bickmore

Introduction
Ellen Oldham Bickmore, was born on October 1, 1847, in Bury, Lancashire, England, the daughter of John Oldham and Maria Heap Oldham. She came from a family of 10 children and Ellen was the sixth child. Her parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1849 and in 1864 they left Liverpool, England, to join the Saints in Zion.

Ancestry
Ellen Oldham Bickmore's paternal grandfather, William Oldham, was born at Haslingden, Lancashire, England, on 16 March 1790. Her paternal grandmother, Alice Barnes Oldham, was born in the same city on 18 March 1787. Her Oldham grandparents were married on 14 May 1812. Their three children were John Oldham*, (born 13 June 1813, died 24 November 1874), Mary Ann Oldham (Heap) (born 22 December 1815), Alice Oldham (Sharples) (born 1818) all born at Haslingden, England.

The Oldham grandparents engaged in hand-loom weaving, the only kind of cloth weaving then known in England. During the early part of their lives, power looms, operated by steam power were invented. At one time William Oldham owned seven looms and employed many people to operate them. The introduction of power looms was accompanied by great initial opposition on the part of people who used hand looms to gain a livelihood for many years. It now seemed they would he deprived of that means of earning a living. Both Oldham grandparents were buried in Saint James Church yard at Haslingden, England.

Ellen 's maternal grandparents, John Heap (born 1786, died May 1825) and Alice Howorth Heap (born 8 April 1780, died 5 May 1825) both of Haslingden, Lancashire, England, married September 2, 1811. Their five children were Margaret Heap (Yates) (born 9 February 1813, died 24 May 1890), Henry Heap (born 13 January 1815, died 13 August 1882), *Maria Heap (Oldham)* (born 28 December. 1816, died 1 January 1886), Ellen Heap (born 12 June 1819, died 12 December 1834), Alice Heap (born 22 November 1822, died 5 May 1825).

Ellen's father, John Oldham, married her mother, Maria Heap, on January 4, 1836, in Lancashire, England. They were also endowed and sealed in the Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah in November 1868. John and Maria Oldham had the following children: William Oldham (born 5 June 1836), Thomas Oldham (born 1 October 1838), Alice Oldham (Mitton) (born 15 December 1840), John Oldham (born 12 May 1843), Maria Oldham (Tams) (born 14 June 1845), *Ellen Oldham (Bickmore)* (born 1 October 1847), Margaret Oldham (Crapo) (born 11 December 1849), Samuel Oldham (born 3 March 1852), James Henry Oldham (born 2 December 1855), Eliza Oldham (Remington) (born 27 February 1858).

The family business involved weaving. John Oldham, the father, worked first on a hand-loom and afterwards he and his children, as they grew up, handled power looms. John and Maria Oldham were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 8nints in 1849 in Bury, Lancashire, England. They emigrated with seven children from England to Utah starting on the 18 of May 1864. They crossed the ocean on the Ship, General McClellan, and were thirty-one days reaching New York. They then spent nine days and nights on the railroad car traveling to Saint Joseph, Missouri and then two days and nights on a steamboat travelling up the Missouri River, arriving at the city called Wyoming on the Missouri River, in July 1864. After remaining there about three weeks, they started on the journey across the plains in Captain Warren's ox-team wagon company, travelling for eleven weeks before arriving in Salt Lake
City on October 4, 1864. An arduous journey, both John and Maria were sick for three weeks, before reaching the Salt Lake Valley. Nutritious food was scarce during the journey. After arriving in Salt Lake City, all commenced to improve and enjoy the best of health.

Travel to Zion
John Oldham and Maria. Heap Oldham emigrated to the United States on the Ship, General McClellan, which sailed on May 21, 1864, from Liverpool, England, to New York. Their Church leader on the voyage was Thomas Jeremy. They arrived in New York, New York, on June 23, 1864. We include here a partial passenger list from the General McClellan Voyage of May 1864, identifying 8 members of the Oldham family. Ellen Oldham was a young girl of 16 during the trip to Zion.

Mormon Immigration Index -Partial Passenger Lise
General McClellan (May 1864)
• Name......................Born

• O'NIEL, Samuel <1864>
• OLDHAM, John <1814>
• OLDHAM, Maria <1817>
• OLDHAM, Alice <1841>
• OLDHAM, Ellen <1848>
• OLDHAM, Mary Ann<1850>
• OLDHAM, Samuel <1852>
• OLDHAM, James H.<1856>
• OLDHAM, Eliza <1858>

To gain insight into the voyage, we quote a segment of the General Voyage Notes from the Ship, General McClellan.

General McClellan (May 1864)

A Compilation of General Voyage Notes
"DEPARTURE. - We had the pleasure of clearing the ship General McClellan (Captain Trask) for the port of New York, on Saturday, May 21. This ship was chartered to sail on the 20th ultimo, but, owing to the rain which set in, the upper deck could not be used for the purpose of examination of passengers, who had consequently to undergo inspection between decks. This put them to some inconvenience and discomfort, but, notwithstanding this, we did not hear one unkind word or one ill-natured remark from the Saints during the proceedings which occupied some little time.

In consequence of unavoidable delays, the vessel could not be cleared until next day (21st). On the morning of the 21st President Cannon, with a number of elders, proceeded on-board the vessel for the purpose of organizing the company. Appropriate instructions were given to the Saints, and Elder Thomas E. Jeremy was appointed to preside over the company, with Elders Joseph Bull and George G. Bywater to assist him as counselors. Elder John C. Graham was chosen clerk of the company. The ship was divided off into wards, over each of which an elder was placed to preside. On the evening of the 21st the vessel proceeded to sea, laden with her freight of precious souls, and accompanied by the beat wishes and prayers of all true Saints. She had 802 souls on-board, nearly all of whom have paid their fares through to Wyoming [Nebraska]. Four elders who had come from Zion on missions, sailed in this vessel. Their names are, Thomas E. Jeremy, Joseph Bull, George G. Bywater and M. F. Farnsworth .... "


"Sat. 21 [May 1864] - The ship General McClellan sailed from Liverpool, England, with 802 Saints, under the direction of Thomas E. Jeremy, Joseph Bull and George G. Bywater. It arrived at New York, June 23rd, and the company arrived at Wyoming (Nebraska) July 3rd." Mormon Immigration Index - Personal Accounts

On board the General McClellan, Sunday, June 19, 1864. The health of this company, we believe, is more than average. It has been a subject of surprise to Captain Trask and the surgeon. They have admitted that for so large a company, they have never been associated with a more healthy or happier class of persons. Thus far, we have but one death to record: a child of five weeks, whose mother died soon after its birth in England. Two births have occurred on board. Both mothers are doing fine. Four marriages have taken place on board.

New York to Salt Lake City
Jane L. Sprunt Warner Garner, a young girl from Scot.land, about the same age as Ellen Oldham, wrote of her experiences on the same voyage and a similar wagon company as Ellen Oldham. Her writing gives insight into experiences while crossing the plains in a wagon train and also about problems in the United States around 1864.

General McClellan (May 1864) Autobiography of Jane L. Sprunt Warner Garner.

We arrived in New York City June 23rd, and left the same day for St. Louis. It was impossible for us to get passenger cars all the way as the United States was involved in the midst of the Civil War and the government was using most of the railroads for the movement of war supplies and troops; but we, wit.h four hundred and fifty other immigrants bound for Zion, were finally fortunate enough to secure transportation in cattle cars. Arriving thus at St. Louis, we took a small river boat up the Missouri River to Omaha, arriving there July 11, 1864.

We were several days making our tents, getting our wagons loaded and preparing for the long, hazardous journey across the plains. Mother's knee was worse, making it impossible for her to get around, so a bed was made in the wagon. My youngest brother rode with mother and me but the other three children with father walked the whole distance of one thousand and thirty-two miles.

The remarkable faith of my mother was shown in her continued fasting and prayers for recovery. The elders administered to her and she was promised, through her faith and prayers, that she would be able to walk into the Valley of Zion. During the long, bumpy ride for eight weeks, this promise sustained her and alleviated her suffering.

Our company was known as the Captain Rawlins Company which consisted of sixty-six wagons drawn by oxen, three or four yoke to each wagon. At night when we stopped for camp, the captain would give orders to form a circle with the wagons as a protection against the Indians. We met many on the long journey and the captain would always give them a little sugar to keep peace with them.

We had what they called a "good trip" having had very few deaths, and arrived in Salt Lake City, September 20, 1864, just four months and two days from the time we left our home in Scotland. My mother, as she had been promised, was able to walk into the Valley.

Mormon Immigration Index - Personal Accounts General McClellan Voyage of May, 21, 1864 from Liverpool.

Life in Paradise, Utah

After remaining three weeks at Salt Lake City, the Oldham family traveled to Paradise, Cache County, in the Northern part of Utah. Their son, John Oldham, (born. 12 May 1843) who emigrated the year previous with the help of his parents had purchased a lot with a log house upon it. To this crude home they came with very grateful hearts, it being over twenty weeks since leaving their home in England. Arriving in Paradise in the last days of October 1864, most of the work that the family could do to help gain a livelihood were completed and jobs were very scarce. The father and the twelve year old son, Samuel, however, did succeed in getting a job at husking corn on shares, one bushel out of seven husked, being the compensation. Arriving in their new home with no means whatever except the corn previously mentioned, it was a very serious question how a long winter could be tided over. This difficulty, however, was considerably lessened by Bishop David James calling the men folks of the Ward together and asking them to make such advances to the incoming emigrants as they could afford. A liberal amount of food such as meat, potatoes, flour, etc. was advanced. All of which was subsequently paid for by Ellen's father. This provided a great help, and came at a most opportune time and stirred up feelings of earnest gratitude to Bishop James and the members of his ward.

In the latter part of that winter, John Oldham Sr. followed his old trade, hand-loom weaving, as cloth for men and women's clothing was extremely scarce and high in price. During 1865 and many succeeding years his time was largely employed in that work. For many years he counted as his year's work, one thousand yards of cloth, and when he accomplished that, he felt as though his vacation had been well earned. In the early part of 1867, Church authorities decided that due to the hostility of the Indians, the isolation of tho community and the limited amount of arable land available, it would be best to move the people and the town site of Paradise to a location three miles to the north. Old Paradise was located where Avon now exists. So most of the year 1868 was taken up with platting and surveying and in getting materials for homes, barns,
sheds, fences, etc. In the spring of 1868, this move was accomplished. John Oldham's son, Samuel, wrote of this time,

"My father and mother endured the hardships and privations of those times not with feelings of complaint or discouragement, but with cheerfulness and gratitude for the blessings they did enjoy. This was Zion in very deed to them and they were willing to plow, plant, and build it to make an enjoyable place to live. On the 24th of November, 1874, my father died at age 61 years. My mother died on January 1, 1886, having just passed her 69th birthday. They lived an honest. and industrious life; were faithful and true to their religious convictions and raised a large and honorable family."

Marriage to Isaac Danford Bickmore
After an acquaintance of nearly a year Ellen Oldham and Isaac Danford Bickmore were married on New Years Eve, December 31, 1866. The following year they settled in Paradise, Utah, where they secured land and built a home. Aside from the farm work, the next few years Isaac Danford and his brother-in-law, Jacob Abbot Oldham, built and operated a saw-mill in which much of the lumber was made that was necessary to build the new town of Paradise.

To this union were born five sons and three daughters. These children were David Newman (born 10 January 1878, died 29 April 1962), Ellen (born 12 January 1875, died 22 June 1968), Martha Maria (born 10 October 1867, died 21 June 1958), William Oldham (born 25 October 1886, died 28 March 1965), Thomas Daniel (born 28 October 1880, died August 1881), Mary Elizabeth (born 20 March 1883, died 18 December 1973), John Jackson (born 3 July 1872, died 9 November 1939), Danford (born 28 March 1870, died 13 May 1937).

From 1882 until 1905, Ellen and Isaac lived on a farm adjoining the town site of Paradise. In their later years, they sold the farm and bought a comfortable home in Logan where two of their married daughters, Martha and Ellen Oldham (Larsen) lived. Ellen and Isaac were living in Logan, when Ellen became very sick. She died on January 5, 1907.
Jacob Nelson Larsen and Ellen Oldham Bickmore Their History and Legacy August 23, 2003

Ellen Oldham Bickmore Larsen was born in Paradise, Cache County, Utah on January 12, 1875, the daughter of Isaac Danford and Ellen Oldham Bickmore. My grandmother, Martha Harvel Bickmore, of Wellsville took care of me and my mother for a few weeks. Our first home was on a farm about two miles north of Paradise. Father's brother, David Bickmore, had a farm adjoining ours. Both my parents were converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. My father was born in Browns County, Illinois, on September 24, 1838. When 17 years of age, he started across the plains with his family to Utah to gather with the Latter-day Saints. While crossing the plains, cholera broke out among them. His father, Isaac Motor Bickmore, and his Grandmother, Margaret Dicks Bickmore, became sick with cholera, died, and were buried together that night in a common grave. They had no boxes to put them in, so they wrapped them each in a feather bed. My Grandmother Bickmore, with her children, went on the next morning with her company.

My mother, Ellen Oldham Bickmore, was born on October 1, 1847, in Bury, Lancashire, England, the daughter of John Oldham and Maria Heap Oldham. They had a family of 10 children and Ellen was the sixth child. Her parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1849. In 1864 they left Liverpool, England, for New York to join the Saints in Utah.

My father, Isaac Danford Bickmore, and Ellen Oldham were married on December 31, 1866, at Paradise, Cache County, Utah. To this union were born five sons and three daughters. These children were Martha, Danford, John, Ellen, Newman, Thomas, Elizabeth, and William. Thomas died when he was about one year old.

Railroad Work in Colorado
When I was about six years old, my father sold his farm and with his family took a trip to see two of my mother's brothers, Thomas and John Oldham. One lived in Atchison, Kansas, and the other lived at Cuba, Kansas. My father decided to work on the new railroad that was being built in Colorado. He brought wagons and teams and hired two men to go along.

My father decided to take mother and the children along with him as my mother did not have very good health and he thought they would enjoy the outdoor life and she could regain her health.

Mother and the children came back to Paradise in early fall. Then little Thomas, not quite a year old, took sick and died. In about another month my Father's brother, David Bickmore, died, leaving a wife and six children.

My Father, still in Colorado, and very sick at the time, could not come home. This was a great sorrow for my Father and us. When my Father returned from Colorado, we settled in Paradise and he bought a farm about five blocks northeast of the Paradise Cooperative Store.

Jacob Nelson Larsen and Ellen Oldham Bickmore Their History and Legacy August 23, 2003

Listed as recipient of Perpetual Emigrating Fund

NAME INDEX Compiled by Maurine Carr Ward - NAMES of PERSONS AND SURETIES indebted to the PERPETUAL EMIGRATING FUND COMPANY FROM 1850 TO 1877 INCLUSIVE Printed at the Star Book and Job Printing Office, Salt Lake City 1877

Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1956 for Ellen Olden Bickmore
Name: Ellen Olden Bickmore
Titles and Terms:
Death Date: 05 January 1907
Death Place: Logan, Cache, Utah
Birthdate:
Estimated Birth Year: 1848
Birthplace:
Death Age: 59 years 2 months 14 days
Gender: Female
Marital Status:
Race or Color:
Spouse's Name:
Father's Name: John Olden
Father's Titles and Terms:
Mother's Name: Maria Heap
Mother's Titles and Terms:
Film Number: 2229077
Digital GS Number: 4120981
Image Number: 681
Certificate Number: 6

Cause of Death: Typhoid Fever

found on familysearch.org


Good Morning

Oh, I am so happy a little girl said, as she sprang like a lark from her low tumble bed.
This morning, bright morning, good morning Pa Pa,
Oh, give me one kiss for good morning Ma Ma.
Only just look at my pretty canary, chirping as sweet as good morning to Mary.
The sun is peeping strait into my eyes.  Good Morning to you, Master sun for your rise.
Early awaking my birdie and me, and make us as happy as happy, can be.
Happy you may be my dear little girl, as the Mother stroked softly her clustering curl.
Happy awakened this morning both you and the sun.
The little girl turned her bright eyes with a nod,
Ma, may I say "Good morning" to God?  Yes, little darling one, surely you may, kneel as you kneel every Morning to Pray.
Mary knelt solemnly down with her eyes
They looking earnestly into the skies, Her two little hands were folded together, softly she lay on the lap of her Mother "Dear Father in Heaven," she said
I thank thee for watching my snug little bed, and taking good care of me all the long night, and waking me up with the beautiful light.
Oh keep me from naughtiness all the long day, Dear Father who taught little children to pray.
An angel looked down in the sunshine and smiled,
She saw not that angel, That beautiful child.

Recited before a large audience, in England by Ellen Oldham Bickmore at the age of four years.  In the year 1851.

Ellen OLDHAM Bickmore


"Ellen Oldham was born in Bury, Lancashire, England 1 Oct. 1847. She was the sixth of ten children of John and Maria Heap Oldham. Her parents were native to the Lancashire area having been born and married there. The Oldham family for two generations had engaged in the weaving trade. The weaving was done by manual labor in their own home. The invention and development of power looms run by steam made a great change for people engaged in this trade. The power looms were accompanied by great opposition on the part of people who had been using hand looms and felt threatened by the new invention. Great Grandfather Oldham did not feel this way, and acquired seven looms and employed people to manipulate them. "Ellen was involved in the family at an early age. She and the rest of the children all worked the looms in factories as they were growing up. The family lived in the town next to a large factory with a smoke stack, and desired to move from this home not only because of the smoke, but because they felt that the swaying stack would fall down on their home. "In 1844 the Oldham family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Not only did this immediately influence their lives, but also led to the family leaving the weaving trade and England. On May 18, 1864, Ellen, along with seven brothers and sisters left England with their parents. They embarked at Liverpool for New York on the sailing vessel "General McClellan". "Two of her older brothers were already in America. The eldest, William had been killed in battle at South Mountain, Maryland, in the Civil War, two years before the family came to America. John, the other brother, had already arrived in Utah the year before to purchase land for the family's future home. Ellen was seventeen years of age when she made the voyage. "During the voyage two events transpired which lent excitement as well as serious apprehension to all on board. About one o'clock in the morning the tarred rigging of the ship took fire from a spark in the cooks galley. This fire spread with increasing rapidity among the ropes and sails, and when some one raised the cry of fire great excitement prevailed. A few days later when the ship was passing near the Banks of Newfoundland, she struck an iceberg. This happened at four o'clock in the morning, when the watch on deck had retired. The shock was so great that all on board were instantly awakened. It was thought that the ship was sinking but she gradually righted herself. The great rent in her prow caused by contact with the iceberg was soon covered with a tarpolin and timbers to prevent the high seas from dashing in. Fortunately the weather was fair until they arrived in New York. They landed at Castle Garden having been thirty-one days in voyage. On the evening of the day they arrived, they took passage on the steam boat, "St. John" for Albany. There they took the train and for seven days and nights threaded their way across the Eastern and middle states to St. Joseph, Missouri. They landed at a little village, "Wyoming", Nebraska, a short distance from Omaha. "After resting there about three weeks, Ellen's family started on the journey across the plains in Captain Warren's Ox train. Parts of the journey were hazardous. The parents were both sick for about three weeks. During the first part of the trip the Indians were a constant threat, and during the last part nutritious food was scarce. Ellen's memory of thr trip was quite positive however. She remarked that for her it was not a hardship because she loved the company of the other young people and the nights of singing and dancing. "After remaining two or three weeks in Salt Lake City, the family moved to Paradise in the northern part of Utah. When they arrived it was 20 weeks after leaving England. Since it was the end of October when they arrived, work was in short supply. The family immediately faced the problem of food for the winter. The difficulty was lessened by Bishop David James, who called the men of the Ward together and asked them to make such advances to the incoming immigrants as they could afford. A liberal amount of meat, potatoes, flour and other staples were given to the family. As soon as possible Ellen's father paid back his debts to his brothers. "During the winter Ellen's father returned to the weaving trade, as cloth for men and women's clothing was extremely scarce and expensive. Ellen and the other children helped again in weaving. For many years Ellen's father continued at this trade. He counted as his years work one thousand yards of cloth, and when this was accomplished, he felt as though his vacation had been well earned. "In the later part of the summer of 1866, graet clouds of grasshoppers flew upon the town and fields surrounding it, and commenced feeding upon the crops. Considerable loss was inflicted this first season. The insects hatched from the eggs, and destroyed practically all the crops that were planted. Thus, it continued alternately for six years. One year the insects would fly in early and destroy half the crop and lay their eggs. The next year the eggs would hatch and the crops would be almost entirely destroyed before the grasshoppers obtained sufficient growth to fly away. This was known as the Grasshopper War, and had the effect of keeping the people poor and unable to build up their surroundings as far as they would otherwise would have done. "During 1866 Ellen met Isaac Danford Bickmore, and after a short courtship they married in a civil ceremony on New Year's Eve. Immediately after their marriage they made their home in Wellsville, Utah, but the following winter they moved, settling in Paradise, where Ellen's husband became a farmer. "Ellen's brothers, Thomas and John, had left Utah and moved to Kansas to farm. Letters came to Ellen and Danford trying to persuade them that life would be better for them in Kansas. Danford finally decided that the family should seriously investigate the brothers offer. In the summer of 1880 they sold their farm in Paradise and went to Kansas where Thomas and John Oldham lived. At this time Ellen and Danford had six children: Martha, Danford Jr., John, Ellen, Newman, and Thomas. "After making the difficult decision to move, selling the farm land, and transporting eight people such a long way, the family was anticipating a new and much better place to live. Perhaps Ellen would have been content to stay by her family in Utah, but Danford desired the new opportunity and possible adventure. When the family arrived in Kansas, their disappointment was great. The brothers had greatly exaggerated their situation in Kansas, possibly because they so wanted Ellen and Danford with them. The Bickmore's had given up the security they had and found little to be excited about upon their arrival. Food was scarce, often meal after meal would consist of potatoes and bread. The family had made a mistake. Now Danford looked toward Texas as a possible new home for his family. Ellen was to move back to Utah while her husband worked on the new railroad and earned money for land in Texas. They travelled together as far as Gunnison, Colorado. Ellen and the children then took the train to Utah. Danford bought wagons and teams and worked on the construction of the railroad. "Ellen arrived in Paradise, Utah in the early fall. New sorrow was soon to follow, and this tragedy would determine their home for many years. A short time after her arrival Thomas, not quite one year old, became sick and died. The next month David Bickmore, her brother-in-law died and left a wife and six children. Word was sent to Danford but he was very sick with pneumonia in Colorado at the time and could not get home immediately. When he was well, he felt that the plans for Texas must be dropped and he returned to Paradise to settle and help with his brother's family. Danford and David had been very fond of one another. Danford felt that he must return and take his brother's place. The weight must have been very great on Danford, now there were eleven children and two women dependent on him. "When Ellen's husband returned they settled in Paradise on a farm about five blocks northeast of the Paradise Co-op Store. Two more children were born, Elizabeth and William. Ellen's life in Paradise was a relatively quiet one. Her time could now be spent doing things she liked best. She was an example of the hard-working, industrious, religious farm woman that was typical of this time. "Her home was one that was remembered for its home-makers atmosphere. Her culinary skills were well known. The kitchen was never without a full crock of sour cream, molasses, and caraway cookies. A special treat seen by the grandchildren was fresh whipped cream cakes, four or five layers high. Much of her social life centered around sewing bees. Her sisters and friends gathered at her long dining room table for an afternoon of fun and conversation which could be justified by the useful production of rugs. "The money that came from the sale of butter and eggs was Ellen's to do with as she saw fit. The first donation to be taken care of was tithing paid to the church. This she did by donating butter which was always individually marked with a rose symbol. During the period of time that the Logan temple was being built, she organized the "Sunday egg fund". Profits of which were given to the church for the Temple. "The picture that comes to the minds of those who remembered her was one of a kindly, hard-working family woman, always wearing a long white apron with lace and embroidery. She was surrounded by her children until they had families of their own, and she always attended each illness and birth. She was remembered for her good cooking and skillful sewing and weaving. She helped her mother with the sock-knitting from the time she was four years old. Ellen was a woman who seemed content with her lot in life. The writings left by her children suggest that she was also seen by them as a devoted, dominate woman who took an active part in shaping their lives both by teaching and example. "In 1904, Danford and Ellen sold the farm and bought a home in Logan, Utah. In the latter part of 1906, water from the corral drained toward the house and contaminated the water in the kitchen sink pump. Ellen and sons Danford, Newman, and William contacted typhoid fever and all were sick for about six weeks. On January 5, 1907 Ellen Oldham Bickmore died from the disease. "Funeral services were held at Paradise and eulogies of praise and honor were given in respect to her exemplary life and character. Her many friends and associates formed a large cortage that followed her remains to the Paradise Cemetery. She was buried on January 8, 1907." --From Family Tree Maker CD's contributed by Gordon E. White. He does not know who authored the account of Ellen Oldham. Sent by JoAnn Hall.
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